Revolutionizing Awareness

helping humanity, make choices, more so through awareness, than ignorance

Posts Tagged ‘poverty’

Set Yourself Free

Posted by Admin on September 28, 2012

by Owen K Waters

Back in the Middle Ages in Europe, the popular path towards spirituality was to become a monk or a nun. Monasteries and convents were well funded as their local populations were compelled by law to, not only attend church on Sundays, but also to donate 10 percent of their incomes to the church.

Monks and nuns took vows which relieved them of the distractions of having to make a living. They took vows of poverty, chastity and obedience. Freed from the distractions of laboring for pay or supporting a family, they were able to pass many hours per day in worship and contemplation. The obedience part of the vow was thrown in for good measure because it suited those in charge.

The problem is that, once a vow is taken, it becomes stored in your subconscious mind which, unlike your physical brain, lives on after death and reincarnates with your spirit into each new life.

If you are struggling today with money issues, close relationships, or you feel a lack of the initiative that could solve your problems, you probably took a vow of poverty, chastity and obedience in a past life. Such vows seemed like a good idea at the time but, because reincarnation was banned from the teachings of the Bible, no one realized what trouble this would cause in future lives.

Such vows were taken with no expiration date. There was no “until death do us part” type of clause included, so these individuals’ subconscious minds faithfully recorded the vows as obligations which would continue until further notice. Today, you might be struggling to pay bills and wanting to create prosperity in your life to end the struggle. But if you have a subconscious blockage that says, “Must not have money” or “Money is bad,” then the blockage will prevail and you’ll continue to struggle.

From a neutral, detached point of view, it is obvious that money, which is just another form of energy, can’t actually be “bad” any more than electricity is bad. Functionally, money is no more than the currency of personal energy. It represents the work you’ve done and your ability to pay for the work of others to supply your needs. If you have a mental block about money, then perhaps it’s time to stop suffering and kick out the block!

While the poverty part of the vow will produce financial hardship, the chastity part will make relationships unfulfilling. The obedience part leads to a belief that people who have gained positions of authority know best. This self-denying stance is no longer appropriate in today’s world, as these are the days when the Spiritual Age is emerging. Today, we live in a self-empowered age which calls for individual mastery of life, not the blind following of anyone who claims to know best. They rarely do.

There is one expert in this world who knows what’s really best for you and you see that person every time you look in the mirror! Look into the reflection of your eyes – the windows of the soul – and ask for the eternal wisdom that lies within you to come forth. You already know the answer to every personal challenge. Just give your conscious mind permission to hear that inner wisdom.

Sooner or later, all obsolete vows need to be released in order to set yourself free from the invisible chains of self-imposed limitation. Any vows taken in past lives with no expiration date are typically inappropriate in the way they affect later lives. The circumstances that made a past life vow appropriate at the time no longer exist because every life is a different adventure in a different setting.

In order to develop your own potential, you need to be free of obsolete, past-life obligations. Only you can develop your potential. No one else can do it for you. This life is your adventure and it is your time to either grow to realize your true potential or to be hobbled continually by blockages that slow everything down.

If you suspect that your subconscious mind may be harboring inappropriate vows, you can release them quite simply by conscious effort. Here’s how to set yourself free with your own personal Declaration of Independence:

Enter a quiet state and make this necessary and long-overdue statement:

“I now renounce and release all vows that I have taken which have outlived their purposes and which now limit my potential for growth. I reclaim my personal freedom and declare such vows renounced and released as of now. I replace old vows with the knowing that I am loved and that I am Love.”

For best effect, repeat it two or more times, adding feeling and meaning each time. Continue to revisit the statement until you feel truly liberated and able to move forward to grow and naturally prosper in these, the dawning days of The Spiritual Age.

Set your friends free! Forward this email and let them know how to release hidden limitations.

This material was excerpted from Owen Waters’ book, “Love, Light, Laughter: The New Spirituality,” which is available in paperback and as a downloadable e-book.

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50 Economic Numbers From 2011 That Are Almost Too Crazy To Believe

Posted by Admin on December 22, 2011

http://www.pakalertpress.com/2011/12/16/50-economic-numbers-from-2011-that-are-almost-too-crazy-to-believe/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+pakalert+%28Pak+Alert+Press%29

Posted on  on December 16, 2011 // 1 Comment

The Economic Collapse

Even though most Americans have become very frustrated with this economy, the reality is that the vast majority of them still have no idea just how bad our economic declinehas been or how much trouble we are going to be in if we don’t make dramatic changes immediately.  If we do not educate the American people about how deathly ill the U.S. economy has become, then they will just keep falling for the same old lies that our politicians keep telling them.  Just “tweaking” things here and there is not going to fix this economy.  We truly do need a fundamental change in direction.  America is consuming far more wealth than it is producing and our debt is absolutely exploding.  If we stay on this current path, an economic collapse is inevitable.  Hopefully the crazy economic numbers from 2011 that I have included in this article will be shocking enough to wake some people up.

At this time of the year, a lot of families get together, and in most homes the conversation usually gets around to politics at some point.  Hopefully many of you will use the list below as a tool to help you share the reality of the U.S. economic crisis with your family and friends.  If we all work together, hopefully we can get millions of people to wake up and realize that “business as usual” will result in a national economic apocalypse.

The following are 50 economic numbers from 2011 that are almost too crazy to believe….

#1 A staggering 48 percent of all Americans are either considered to be “low income” or are living in poverty.

#2 Approximately 57 percent of all children in the United States are living in homes that are either considered to be “low income” or impoverished.

#3 If the number of Americans that “wanted jobs” was the same today as it was back in 2007, the “official”unemployment rate put out by the U.S. government would be up to 11 percent.

#4 The average amount of time that a worker stays unemployed in the United States is now over 40 weeks.

#5 One recent survey found that 77 percent of all U.S. small businesses do not plan to hire any more workers.

#6 There are fewer payroll jobs in the United States today than there were back in 2000 even though we have added 30 million extra people to the population since then.

#7 Since December 2007, median household income in the United States has declined by a total of 6.8%once you account for inflation.

#8 According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 16.6 million Americans were self-employed back in December 2006.  Today, that number has shrunk to 14.5 million.

#9 A Gallup poll from earlier this year found that approximately one out of every five Americans that do have a job consider themselves to be underemployed.

#10 According to author Paul Osterman, about 20 percent of all U.S. adults are currently working jobs that pay poverty-level wages.

#11 Back in 1980, less than 30% of all jobs in the United States were low income jobs.  Today, more than 40% of all jobs in the United States are low income jobs.

#12 Back in 1969, 95 percent of all men between the ages of 25 and 54 had a job.  In July, only 81.2 percent of men in that age group had a job.

#13 One recent survey found that one out of every three Americans would not be able to make a mortgage or rent payment next month if they suddenly lost their current job.

#14 The Federal Reserve recently announced that the total net worth of U.S. households declined by 4.1 percent in the 3rd quarter of 2011 alone.

#15 According to a recent study conducted by the BlackRock Investment Institute, the ratio of household debt to personal income in the United States is now 154 percent.

#16 As the economy has slowed down, so has the number of marriages.  According to a Pew Research Center analysis, only 51 percent of all Americans that are at least 18 years old are currently married.  Back in 1960, 72 percent of all U.S. adults were married.

#17 The U.S. Postal Service has lost more than 5 billion dollars over the past year.

#18 In Stockton, California home prices have declined 64 percent from where they were at when the housing market peaked.

#19 Nevada has had the highest foreclosure rate in the nation for 59 months in a row.

#20 If you can believe it, the median price of a home in Detroit is now just $6000.

#21 According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 18 percent of all homes in the state of Florida are sitting vacant.  That figure is 63 percent larger than it was just ten years ago.

#22 New home construction in the United States is on pace to set a brand new all-time record low in 2011.

#23 As I have written about previously, 19 percent of all American men between the ages of 25 and 34 are now living with their parents.

#24 Electricity bills in the United States have risen faster than the overall rate of inflation for five years in a row.

#25 According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, health care costs accounted for just 9.5% of all personal consumption back in 1980.  Today they account for approximately 16.3%.

#26 One study found that approximately 41 percent of all working age Americans either have medical bill problems or are currently paying off medical debt.

#27 If you can believe it, one out of every seven Americans has at least 10 credit cards.

#28 The United States spends about 4 dollars on goods and services from China for every one dollar that China spends on goods and services from the United States.

#29 It is being projected that the U.S. trade deficit for 2011 will be 558.2 billion dollars.

#30 The retirement crisis in the United States just continues to get worse.  According to the Employee Benefit Research Institute, 46 percent of all American workers have less than $10,000 saved for retirement, and 29 percent of all American workers have less than $1,000 saved for retirement.

#31 Today, one out of every six elderly Americans lives below the federal poverty line.

#32 According to a study that was just released, CEO pay at America’s biggest companies rose by 36.5% in just one recent 12 month period.

#33 Today, the “too big to fail” banks are larger than ever.  The total assets of the six largest U.S. banks increased by 39 percent between September 30, 2006 and September 30, 2011.

#34 The six heirs of Wal-Mart founder Sam Walton have a net worth that is roughly equal to the bottom 30 percent of all Americans combined.

#35 According to an analysis of Census Bureau data done by the Pew Research Center, the median net worth for households led by someone 65 years of age or older is 47 times greater than the median net worth for households led by someone under the age of 35.

#36 If you can believe it, 37 percent of all U.S. households that are led by someone under the age of 35 have a net worth of zero or less than zero.

#37 A higher percentage of Americans is living in extreme poverty (6.7%) than has ever been measured before.

#38 Child homelessness in the United States is now 33 percent higher than it was back in 2007.

#39 Since 2007, the number of children living in poverty in the state of California has increased by 30 percent.

#40 Sadly, child poverty is absolutely exploding all over America.  According to the National Center for Children in Poverty, 36.4% of all children that live in Philadelphia are living in poverty, 40.1% of all children that live in Atlanta are living in poverty, 52.6% of all children that live in Cleveland are living in poverty and 53.6% of all children that live in Detroit are living in poverty.

#41 Today, one out of every seven Americans is on food stamps and one out of every four American children is on food stamps.

#42 In 1980, government transfer payments accounted for just 11.7% of all income.  Today, government transfer payments account for more than 18 percent of all income.

#43 A staggering 48.5% of all Americans live in a household that receives some form of government benefits.  Back in 1983, that number was below 30 percent.

#44 Right now, spending by the federal government accounts for about 24 percent of GDP.  Back in 2001, it accounted for just 18 percent.

#45 For fiscal year 2011, the U.S. federal government had a budget deficit of nearly 1.3 trillion dollars.  That was the third year in a row that our budget deficit has topped one trillion dollars.

#46 If Bill Gates gave every single penny of his fortune to the U.S. government, it would only cover the U.S. budget deficit for about 15 days.

#47 Amazingly, the U.S. government has now accumulated a total debt of 15 trillion dollars.  When Barack Obama first took office the national debt was just 10.6 trillion dollars.

#48 If the federal government began right at this moment to repay the U.S. national debt at a rate of one dollar per second, it would take over 440,000 years to pay off the national debt.

#49 The U.S. national debt has been increasing by an average of more than 4 billion dollars per day since the beginning of the Obama administration.

#50 During the Obama administration, the U.S. government has accumulated more debt than it did from the time that George Washington took office to the time that Bill Clinton took office.

Of course the heart of our economic problems is the Federal Reserve.  The Federal Reserve is a perpetual debt machine, it has almost completely destroyed the value of the U.S. dollar and it has an absolutely nightmarish track record of incompetence.  If the Federal Reserve system had never been created, the U.S. economy would be in far better shape.  The federal government needs to shut down the Federal Reserve and start issuing currency that is not debt-based.  That would be a very significant step toward restoring prosperity to America.

During 2011 we made a lot of progress in educating the American people about our economic problems, but we still have a long way to go.

Hopefully next year more Americans than ever will wake up, because 2012 is going to represent a huge turning point for this country.

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In Haryana, get a bride for Rs 1,000 from Bihar

Posted by Admin on December 1, 2010

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/chandigarh/In-Haryana-get-a-bride-for-Rs-1000-from-Bihar/articleshow/7003264.cms

Sukhbir Siwach, TNN, Nov 28, 2010, 05.49am IST

CHANDIGARH: Haryana, reeling under a skewed sex ratio, is faced with yet another startling fact – anNGO has found that girls are being “bought” and brought to Haryana from 20 states across the country. The state’s sex ratio stands at 837 in the 0-6 years age group, its lowest in the last five years and second only to Punjab.

In one case, the family of a girl from Bihar was paid just Rs 1,000.

In its report released in Pune on Saturday, the NGO,Drishti Stree Adhyayan Prabodhan Kendra, has found that most of the girls were brought from West Bengal, Bihar, Andhra Pradesh and Assam. It’s findings also indicate that girls were bought within the state too.

The NGO surveyed 10,190 households in Haryana and found 318 women who were bought and married off to men in Haryana. The NGO has shared the findings with the Haryana government.

Among these 318 women, 145 are from different parts of Haryana, followed by West Bengal (43), Bihar (27), Andhra Pradesh (17), Assam (15), Uttar Pradesh (14), Himachal Pradesh (11) and Rajasthan (10). Women have been brought from other states too, including even prosperous states like Gujarat.

The NGO has covered a population of 56,520 in 92 villages of five districts — Sonipat, Karnal, Mahendragarh, Sirsa and Mewat. The study was conducted to ascertain whether the brides came from other states and if a price was paid to get them to Haryana.

The NGO found that in number of cases, men had to buy their wives despite the fact that dowry system is prevalent in Jatland.

The report says whenever respondents were asked about money being paid for brides, the women chose to be silent. Only 15 women out of 318 reported that money was paid to their families. The amount varied between Rs 10,000 and Rs 1.5 lakh.

“This may not be a big amount but these girls come from poor families and this could be luring parents to give away their daughters, despite the girls going to faraway lands and having to adjust into alien culture,” the report said.

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Grains worth millions rot at Udaipur railway station

Posted by Admin on July 9, 2010

Thu, Jul 8 03:55 PM

Udaipur, July 8 (ANI): In a case of gross administrative negligence, grain stock worth millions of rupees has been left to rot at the Rana Pratap Railway Station in Rajasthan’s Udaipur city.

Containing thousands of kilograms of wheat and peas, hundreds of gunnysacks had arrived at the station from Punjab and Haryana. They were to be supplied under the public distribution system to the below poverty line (BPL) households in the region.

The Food Corporation of India (FCI) had sent nearly 100,000 gunnysacks carrying wheat meant for consumption by poor, while the National Cooperative Consumers Federation (NCCF) for India had transported many tonnes of yellow peas for the same purpose.

Due to lack of proper storage facilities, the grain was left in open and the monsoon speeded up their decay.

Noticing such negligence, furious local residents confronted NCCF official Jitendra Dubey, who had arrived at the platform to inspect the consignment.

“These grains are meant for the poorest of the poor, the below poverty line (BPL) households that live on these grains. Millions of poor people are waiting for the grain stocks, which are rotting here. The situation is deplorable since no one, from the contractor to the railway officials and food corporation authorities of India are concerned about this,” said Jitendra Shastri, President of the Udaipur Youth Forum.

When asked the reason for the authorities failing to preserve the food stock, Dubey refused to comment.

Emitting a repugnant odour, the grains have still not been carted out of the railway station, and rodents and insects have now infested the stock. A white layer of fungi has also been observed forming on many of the gunnysacks.

“The food stock is lying rotten on the ground. A white fungus like layer has formed upon the gunnysacks and due to the rains, they have been rendered useless and inedible. The stock is stinking. However, despite all this, there is no separation of grains being done by the contractors who are supplying this stock. It is unfortunate that these rotting grains will be transported to the cities and supplied to consumers,” said Ramesh, a local consumer.

The supply and consumption of such infected food grains could be dangerous to human health, he added.

Meanwhile, the authorities maintained that the grain has not been destroyed as yet, and that the transportation and supply was going on to the ‘best of their abilities.’

“The grain stock has not destroyed as yet. Thousands of gunny bags are currently lying on the railway platform, and the labourers have been working hard to transport them to godowns. They work from morning till evening. The stock arrived at the station just four days back, and yesterday there was a national shutdown. How much work can the labourers possible do?” said Himmat Singh Bhati, a Food Corporation of India official stated. (ANI)

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Poverty and Destitution in India: Farmers sell wives after crops fail

Posted by Admin on January 17, 2010

Changing Lives

Global Research, September 13, 2009

The Independent – 2009-09-07

North Indian farmers are selling their wives to survive, it has been revealed.

Left without money due to failing crops, debt-ridden farmers in Bundelkhand, Uttar Pradesh, have reportedly been selling their wives to money lenders for Rs 4,000 – 12,000 (£50-150).

The more beautiful the woman, the higher the price that she fetches, it was claimed.

The deals are allegedly being settled on a legal stamp paper under the heading “Vivaha Anubandh” meaning Marriage Contract. Once the new “husband” is tired of the woman, she is allegedly sold to another man.

The National Commission for Women (NCW) is now sending a team to investigate the reports.

Girija Vyas, chief of the NCW, said: “It is awful and unbelievable that it still happens in the country, and that too in Uttar Pradesh where the chief minister is a woman.

“We are sending a team to find out the details and have asked for the report within 24 hours.”

She added that the commission had also written a letter to the state’s chief minister.

One of the victims said: “My husband sold me to another man for Rs 8,000 (£100) only. My buyer took me to the court to make our wedding look legal. During the trip I got the chance to escape.”

In most cases, the women are illiterate and cannot read what is written in the “contract”.

A farmer who helped expose the situation to the Indian media said he is now being harassed.

“I was summoned to the police station and questioned,” the man who is known only as Kalicharan said.

“I told them I had spoken to the media because no one was listening to us. But they threatened me and said I was lying. My wife was also called to the police station.”

With reports suggesting that thousands of farmers in the region are involved, the situation has spiralled into a major political crisis.

Opposition parties are blaming the Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) government led by chief minister Mayawati for the problem.

The state Congress president Rita Bahuguna Joshi said: “It is a painful situation. I am sending a team of Congress workers to help these women.”

A spokesman for leading opposition, the Bharatiya Janata Party, said: “Both the BSP-led state government and the Congress at the centre are responsible for this.

“The centre has been talking of creating a separate authority for Bundelkhand while some factions want a state. Nobody is helping these farmers.”

Erratic rainfall in the region this year is one of the main causes of failing crops.

by Dielle D’Souza

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The Reality of Mass Poverty and Social Exclusion: “How is India?”

Posted by Admin on January 17, 2010

Global Research, April 25, 2009

socialistproject.ca

Changing borders

“How is India?” asked an erudite friend of mine from North America soon after I reached India last December.

How indeed? I write this piece this week as India goes to the polls: a mammoth process involving 714 million voters is about to unfold over the next one month. The polity looks fractured as never before. Each state – and India has 35 of them – has its own political dynamic shaped by a complex gamut of regional political parties. Relentless opportunism and political ambition, bolstered often by massive private wealth appears to have given rise to a multiplicity of candidates and parties who are able to cull a platform sometimes out of thin air, or even worse, by fuelling caste or ethnic conflict or abusing divisive ‘local’ issues. So deep is the fracture this time, that it looks like 543 discrete elections are being held for the 543 parliamentary seats. No party is able to shape or capture the national imagination, as it were.

Underneath this fractured polity, lies of course, a deeply exclusionary and unequal material reality. Some 200 million are chronically hungry, more than 90 percent of the workforce have no option but informal work with abysmal wages and no security; 80 percent live under $2 a day; 70 percent depend on agriculture for their livelihood; 182,936 farmers have committed suicide; and so on.

The global meltdown has brought yet another level of decimation for the ordinary people. It is estimated that at least half a million jobs have been lost in the export sectors, where barring the IT sector, those affected are informal wage workers, primarily migrants who are forced to return home as they are retrenched. There is little by way of employment opportunity there and entire families are in acute distress due to the sudden end to their remittance incomes. A secondary and more insidious effect is perhaps the fear such retrenchment generates amongst workers who are somehow able to retain their jobs. If migrant workers come from homes where opportunities are decimated and other family members are returning home as they are retrenched, they are very likely to work under conditions they otherwise would not. The fear of retrenchment is a disciplinary mechanism par excellence. Industry leaders thus routinely call for greater labour market flexibility, citing the fact that competition from countries such as Bangladesh – based on low labour costs – are hurting profitability of Indian exports.

Under these circumstances, a fractured polity plays a highly contradictory role. On the one hand, it helps resist the tyranny of a ‘center.’ It can provide the autonomy that a state or local government might require if it wishes to experiment with alternatives (this has been the case of Kerala, the state with the best development record). On the other hand, it vastly reduces the possibility of constructing resistance to problematic policy frameworks on a scale that can actually shift the direction of things. This happens via two causal mechanisms: first, that the fracture hides the constellations of power; and second, it vastly diminishes the possibilities of solidarity.

First about power. There are many dimensions of power – and many constellations that we can speak of. But given the election season, let me take one here: the dimension of private wealth and the manner in which it is facilitating access to political office.

National Election Watch, a civil society watchdog doing exemplary work on the elections, has released a report which analyses the criminal records, financial assets and educational background of all candidates. Most still refuse to declare their wealth, but even declared wealth has grown by 400 per cent since 2002. According to National Election Watch report, in Karnataka, the state which is home to India’s Silicon Valley, one out of every four contestants is a multi-millionaire. In Maharashtra, home to Mumbai, about 12 percent are multi-millionaires. Seven multi-millionaires are contesting from one the poorest regions in the country in the state of Orissa (a region known historically for the incidence of famine and starvation deaths).

Quite apart from these multi-millionaires, a number of wealthy business professionals have joined the fray as independent candidates. Their mission, as they proclaim, is to “clean politics.” While the political fate is not expected to shine too much in the current elections, they are playing an important role in numbing any possible critique of corporate power. Indeed, the idea that ‘politics’ is unrelated to ‘business’ and vice-versa and that business has the tools and the ethos to solve major social problems has been a critical element of the normative order of neoliberalism, in India and worldwide.

The material reality accompanying this normative order is quite extraordinary. The wealth of 40 richest Indians have come to equal about 30 percent of its trillion-dollar GDP. Of the 47 Indian companies that have made it to the Forbes List of the Global 2000 this year, the sales of each of the top two equal the GDP of India’s poorest 12 states taken together. In a list of the top 50 economic entities in India – comprising of Indian states and Indian corporations – 28 are corporations. Reliance Industries, the corporation that tops the list, has an annual revenue that exceeds the gross domestic product of Kerala by about $2-billion.

The fracturing of the polity not only obscures these constellations of power, but also diminishes the possibility of solidarity and the construction of alternatives.

Consider for example, the resistance to Special Economic Zones (SEZs) or more generally, the resistance to industrialization which displaces small peasants without compensating them adequately or without their consent. In the state of West Bengal, which has been ruled by a Left government since 1977, this conflict came to a head over two projects. The Left Front government actively solicited these projects. Thereafter, it was found deficient in the way it planned these projects, – and worse, took recourse to violence when faced with resistance. It is likely that the Left is going to be punished for this failure of governance in the current elections, as it should be, if electoral politics is to have any substance.

But this is only half the story. What is likely to replace the Left, or dent its prowess, is not a progressive pro-people political configuration – but a constellation of opportunists of various shades. The latter has no agenda for growth or development, industrial or otherwise. The irony in these events is worth noting. While particular factors in West Bengal brought the SEZ/industrialization issue to such a head, the resistance to SEZ did not occur in West Bengal alone. The demand for appropriate designed and democratically governed models of industrialization was voiced by many different communities across India. This was not an opposition to one or two isolated projects, but a more fundamental opposition to the false choice between displacement on the one hand and absence of livelihood opportunities on the other. The deep fracturing of politics is systematically marginalizing precisely such issues, and in doing so is very effectively pre-empting solidarity. Indeed, solidarity has been critical in the recent successes in engendering change, such as the Right to Food movement, the Right to Information movement, the movement for the National Rural Employment Guarantee Act, etc.

So how is India? Fractured, harassed, trapped within a series of power games orchestrated by its elite? Though poignant and cinematic and Oscar-savvy, this Slumdog narrative is not entirely representative of India. By and large, people continue to struggle, negotiate and survive as best as they can, often winning victories that defy textbook understandings of agency or politics.

As voters, the average Indian remains incredibly astute. As the last elections showed us, all political calculations of an overconfident anti-poor government were revealed to be entirely incorrect, causing them electoral losses they had not imagined. Last week in Hyderabad, India’s hi-tech city, a young man who drives taxis for a living gave me a brilliant analysis. I asked him what according to him “India” is. Without a moment’s hesitation he said, “India is that place where the common man is perpetually looking for justice. There is no justice here, no justice at all.” •

by Prof. Ananya Mukherjee Reed

Ananya Mukherjee Reed teaches development studies at York University, Toronto.

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