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Archive for May 20th, 2012

Magnificent Belur – Poetry in soapstone

Posted by Admin on May 20, 2012

http://in.lifestyle.yahoo.com/photos/magnificent-belur-poetry-in-soapstone-slideshow/belur-chennakeshava-temple-photo-1334830400.html

Magnificent Belur – Poetry in soapstone

Belur, 40 km from Hassan city and 220 km from Bangalore, is in Hassan district of Karnataka state, India. The Chennakeshava temple was built by the Hoysalas under the rule of King Vishnuvardhana in 1117 CE. The deity of this temple is lord Vishnu and the word ‘Chennakeshava’ literally translates to ‘Handsome Vishnu’. Within the temple complex, the Chennakeshava temple is in the centre, facing east, flanked by Kappe Channigaraya temple on its right, and a small Sowmyanayaki temple set slightly back. On its left, set slightly back is the Ranganayaki temple. Two main Sthambhas (pillar) exist here. The pillar facing the main temple, the Garuda sthambha was erected in the Vijayanagara period while the pillar on the right, the Deepasthambha, dates from the Hoysala period.

TEXT AND PHOTOS: ANANTH V RAO

ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPHER: ANANTH V RAO is an engineer by profession and a hobbyist photographer with a passion for picturing architectural grandeur as well as nature and wildlife. He was born and brought up in Hassan, Karnataka, a place known for its culture and heritage. He lives in Bangalore.

Note from the Admin : – Yet another glorious tribute to the timeless splendour and enchanting beauty of my beloved Motherland.

Belur Chennakeshava Temple

The Hoysala emblem at the Chennakeshava temple in Belur depicts the fight between the mythical Sala and a tiger, the emblem of the Cholas. Historians and scholars believe it represents King Vishnuvardhana’s victory over the Cholas at Talakad.

Belur Chennakeshava Temple

The main entrance to the complex is crowned by a Rajagopura built during the days of Vijayanagara empire. The Rajagopura is a five-storey structure comprising idols of Lord Vishnu in different incarnations, as well as erotic idols.

Belur Chennakeshava Temple

A view of the temple with the flag mast in the foreground.

Belur Chennakeshava Temple

The Chennakeshava temple is built on a 4.5 feet plinth. The temple, including the plinth, is in the shape of Sri Chakra (star shape), a characteristic feature of Hoysala architecture. Sri Chakra is considered most auspicious in Hindu religion.

Belur Chennakeshava Temple

Another view of the temple.

Belur Chennakeshava Temple

A pillared corridor inside the temple complex.

Belur Chennakeshava Temple

Tourists at the Chennakeshava temple precincts.

Belur Chennakeshava Temple

Another view of the temple complex.

Belur Chennakeshava Temple

Lord Garuda, the sacred steed of Vishnu, greets devotees at the portals of the temple.

Belur Chennakeshava Temple

Note the intricate carving of the sculpture of Garuda, and its harmony with the temple in the background.

Belur Chennakeshava Temple

The main temple consists of three bottom friezes. The lower frieze depicts charging elephants, which symbolize strength and stability. The middle frieze depicts lions, which symbolize courage and valor. The upper frieze depicts horses, which symbolize speed. No two elephants, lions and horses are alike.

Belur Chennakeshava Temple

A priest in the temple precincts. Belur is among the few Hoysala temples where regular worship services are held.

Belur Chennakeshava Temple

Darpana Sundari (lady with mirror) is one of the main attractions in the temple. The intricate carvings include the mirror frame, the tendrils around the lady, and her jewelry. A maid on her right is feeding grapes to a pet monkey.

Belur Chennakeshava Temple

Shukhabhashini depicts a woman in conversation with a parrot.

Belur Chennakeshava Temple

The scene is called Gajasura Samhara.Lord Shiva, in one of his furious forms- Gajasura Mardana, is dancing on the head of Gajasura, the elephant demon, and ripping off his skin. Observe the ripped skin above Shiva’s head.

Belur Chennakeshava Temple

In Hindu mythology, Bhasmasura was an asura or demon who was granted the power that anyone whose head he touched with his hand should burn up and immediately turn into ashes (bhasma). The asura was tricked by the god Vishnu’s only female avatar, the enchantress Mohini to turn himself into ashes. The specialty of this sculpture is that a drop of water from the tip of her right hand would fall on the left breast, then on the tip of the left hand and then on the thumb of the left leg. Such was the brilliance of Hoysala architecture.

Belur Chennakeshava Temple

Here, a monkey is teasing the lady by pulling her sari. The lady is trying to shoo the monkey off by holding a tendril in her hand.

Belur Chennakeshava Temple

Tribhangi pose is considered to be humanly impossible in Indian dance forms. Tribhangi consists of three bends in the body; at the neck, waist and knee. The body is oppositely curved at waist and neck which gives it a gentle “S” shape.

Belur Chennakeshava Temple

The Hoysalas carved the sculptures incorporating the finest of details. In this photo, one can see the care taken and effort put to carve the fingernails to perfection. Their talent for detail and ability to match imagination to sculpture were matchless.

Belur Chennakeshava Temple

This is a scene from the Mahabharata. Here, Arjuna is piercing the eye of a rotating fish with his bow and arrow by looking at the reflection of the fish in a bowl of oil. He does so to win the hand of Draupadi. Some people say that the bow in this sculpture, which has been destroyed now, would twang when struck.

 

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The Sun Temple of Modhera

Posted by Admin on May 20, 2012

http://in.lifestyle.yahoo.com/photos/the-sun-temple-of-modhera-slideshow/

The Sun Temple of Modhera

The Sun Temple in Modhera, Gujarat was built in the early 11th century by King Bhimdev, in dedication to the Hindu Sun-God, Surya. The temple’s magnificent exterior is intricately carved, and designed in such a way that the sun’s rays illuminate the temple’s sanctum at dawn during the equinoxes. Besides the sanctum, the temple has a pradakshina patha and a sabha mandap, as well as a Surya Kund, a massive tank with stunning miniature shrines that adorn its steps. Yahoo! reader DHARTI PATEL, a student of sculpture and art of Gujarat, shares her experience as she visits the temple of Surya.

Note from Admin : – Behold the grandeur, grandness, magnanimity, intricacy, harmonious and holistic architecture and structural materialisation of this revered and renowned architectural masterpiece dedicated to the Higher Forces of Consciousness shaping Our World perpetually.

sun temple

Temple & Kunda: The Sun Temple at Modhera’s dates back to early 11th century CE and was built by King Bhimdev I in 1026 CE.

sun temple

Sabha Mandap View South West: The mandapa as usual is peristylar with an octagonal nave covered by a splendidly carved dome.

sun temple

Sabha Mandap: This hall of religious gatherings is a magnificent pillared hall. It is open from all sides and has 52 intricately carved pillars representing 52 weeks in a year. The carvings depict episodes from the Hindu epics of Ramayan, Mahabharat and Krishna Lila (i.e., story of Lord Krishna).

sun temple

Toran:Two huge ornamental arches called Torans form a gateway to the Sabha Mandap.

sun temple

View of the Toran, north to south.

sun temple

Front view of the Toran.

sun temple

The exterior of the temple walls have 12 different postures of Aditya, the Sun God, along with eight Dikpals.

sun temple

The eight Dikpalas are the Guardians of Direction, guarding specific directions of space. They are traditionally represented on the walls and ceilings of Hindu temples.

sun temple

The inner half occupies the Garbhagriha and the front one the mandapa (hall). The sanctum sanctorum is 11 feet square inside. Between the outer walls of the sanctum sanctorum and that of the temple is the pradakshina marg (the circumambulatory passage). This passage was roofed with flat slabs laid across and carved with rosettes on the undersides and above this, rose the sikhara.

sun temple

The exterior of the sanctum has many carved images of the Sun God, portrayed as wearing Irani Style Tiara, Long Shoes and Jeweled Belt.

sun temple

The god Surya portrayed here with with seven horses.

sun temple

Lord Vishwakarma – who constructed the golden Dwarka city for Shri Krishna.

sun temple

Goddess Parvati with an apsara.

sun temple

Goddess Parvati with dancing Shiva.

sun temple

The Surya-kunda, also known as Rama-kunda is rectangular, and measures 176 feet north to south, by 120 feet east to west.

sun temple

The Suryakund is a fine example of geometry and pattern art. It has108 miniature shrines carved between the steps inside the tank.

sun temple

There are many terraces and steps leading to the water level. On its sides and corners are various small shrines with the images of gods and goddesses.

sun temple

The missing Toran Arch: Outside this sabha-mandapa are two pillars of a toran from which the arch is missing. From the toran a flight of steps leads down to the kunda.

sun temple

In viewing the Modhera temple as a whole the aesthetic sense at once responds to the elegance of its proportions, the entire composition being lit with the living flame of inspiration. But apart from its material beauty, its designer has succeeded in communicating to it an atmosphere of spiritual grace. The temple faces the east to that the rising sun at the equinoxes filters in a golden cadence through its openings, from door way to corridor, past columned vestibules finally to fall on the image in its innermost chamber.

 

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Life with the Yawalapiti Tribe in Brazil

Posted by Admin on May 20, 2012

http://in.news.yahoo.com/photos/life-with-the-yawalapiti-tribe-in-brazil-slideshow/

Life with the Yawalapiti Tribe in Brazil

Deep in the Brazilian heartland, where the upper reaches of the Amazon Basin dissolve into the central plateau, photographer Ueslei Marcelino had the opportunity to spend several days in the home of the Yawalapiti tribe. The Yawalapiti, one of the 14 tribes living inside the Xingu National Park, were preparing a Quarup, a ritual held over several days to honor in death a person of great importance to them. In its original form, the Quarup was a funeral ritual intended to bring the dead back to life. tenzin yangdon: Today, it is a celebration of life, death and rebirth. From the very oldest to the very youngest, all the members of the Yawalapiti tribe participate in the preparations. This year the Quarup will pay tribute to two people – a Yawalapiti Indian who they consider a great leader, and Darcy Ribeiro, a well-known author, anthropologist and politician known for focusing on the relationship between native peoples and education in Brazil.

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Yawalapiti youth chief Anuia …

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Yawalapiti men play the urua …

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Yawalapiti men wrestle in …

A Yawalapiti wrestler rests …

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The biggest dams in India

Posted by Admin on May 20, 2012

http://in.finance.yahoo.com/photos/the-biggest-dams-in-india-slideshow/biggest-dams-in-india-photo-1336710853.html

The biggest dams in India

Hailed as the “Temples of Resurgent India” by Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru, the country’s dams help provide water and electricity to millions citizens. We look at some of the biggest ones.

Biggest Dams in India

The Tehri Dam is a multi-purpose rock and earth-fill embankment dam on the Bhagirathi River near Tehri in Uttarakhand, India. It is the primary dam of the Tehri Hydro Development Corporation Ltd. and the Tehri hydroelectric complex. The dam is a 260 metres (850 ft) high rock and earth-fill embankment dam. Its length is 575 metres (1,886 ft), crest width 20 metres (66 ft), and base width 1,128 metres (3,701 ft). [Photo: By Arvind Iyer from Mumbai [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons}

The biggest dams in India

Kerala Government has long been demanding construction of a new dam in Mullaperiyar on the KeralaTamil Nadu border. Many believe that the existing 116-year-old dam could pose safety hazard.

While the matter rests with the apex court, we look at some of India’s biggest and most famous dams, hailed by Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru as ‘The Temples of a Resurgent India’.

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The biggest dams in India

Bhakra Dam is a concrete gravity dam across the Sutlej River, and is near the border between Punjab and Himachal Pradesh in northern India. The dam, located at a gorge near the (now submerged) upstream Bhakra village in Bilaspur district of Himachal Pradesh, is Asia’s second highest at 225.55 m (740 ft) high next to the 261m Tehri Dam. The length of the dam (measured from the road above it) is 518.25 m; it is 9.1 m broad. Its reservoir, known as the “Gobind Sagar“, stores up to 9.34 billion cubic meters of water, enough to drain the whole of Chandigarh, parts of Haryana, Punjab and Delhi.The 90 km long reservoir created by the Bhakra Dam is spread over an area of 168.35 km2. In terms of storage of water, it withholds the second largest reservoir in India, the first being Indira Sagar dam in Madhya Pradesh with capacity of 12.22 billion cu m.Nangal dam is another dam downstream of Bhakra dam. [Photo by KawalSingh at en.wikipedia (Transferred from en.wikipedia – Public domain from Wikimedia Commons]

The biggest dams in India

Hirakud Dam is built across the Mahanadi River, about 15 km from Sambalpur in the state of Orissa in India. Built in 1957, the dam is one of the world’s longest earthen dam. Hirakud Dam is the longest man-made dam in the world, about 16 mi (26 km) in length. It is one of the first major multipurpose river valley project started after India’s independence. [Photo by Quarterbacker (Own work) [CC-BY-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons]

The biggest dams in India

Nagarjuna Sagar Dam is the world’s largest masonry dam built across Krishna River in Nagarjuna Sagar, Nalgonda District of Andhra Pradesh, India, between 1955 and 1967. The dam contains the Nagarjuna Sagar reservoir with a capacity of up to 11,472 million cubic metres. The dam is 490 ft (150 m). tall and 1.6 km long with 26 gates which are 42 ft (13 m). wide and 45 ft (14 m). tall. Nagarjuna Sagar was the earliest in the series of large infrastructure projects initiated for the Green Revolution in India; it also is one of the earliest multi-purpose irrigation and hydro-electric projects in India.

The biggest dams in India

The Sardar Sarovar Dam is a gravity dam on the Narmada River near Navagam, Gujarat, India. It is the largest dam and part of the Narmada Valley Project, a large hydraulic engineering project involving the construction of a series of large irrigation and hydroelectric multi-purpose dams on the Narmada River. The project took form in 1979 as part of a development scheme to increase irrigation and produce hydroelectricity. It is the 30th largest dams planned on river Narmada, Sardar Sarovar Dam (SSD) is the largest structure to be built. It has a proposed final height of 163 m (535 ft) from foundation. The dam is one of India’s most controversial dam projects and its environmental impact and net costs and benefits are widely debated. The World Bank was initially a funder of the SSD, but withdrew in 1994. The Narmada Dam has been the centre of controversy and protest since the late 1980s. [Photo by AceFighter19 (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons]

The biggest dams in India

The Indirasagar Dam is a multipurpose key project of Madhya Pradesh on the Narmada River at Narmadanagar in the Khandwa district of Madhya Pradesh in India. The Project envisages construction of a 92 m high and 653 m long concrete gravity dam. It provides Irrigation in 1,230 square kilometres of land with annual production of 2700 million units in the districts of Khandwa and Khargone in Madhya Pradesh and power generation of 1000 MW installed capacity (8×125). The reservoir of 12,200,000,000 m3 (9,890,701 acre•ft) was created.

The biggest dams in India

The biggest dams in India

The Bhavanisagar Dam and Reservoir, also called Lower Bhavani Dam, is located on the Bhavani River between Mettupalayam and Sathyamangalam in Erode District, Tamil Nadu, South India. The dam is situated around 16 km (9.9 mi) west to Satyamangalam and 35 km (22 mi) from Gobichettipalayam, 36 km (22 mi) north-east to Mettuppalayam and 70 km (43 mi) from Erode and 75 km (47 mi) from Coimbatore.

The dam is considered to be among the biggest earthen dams in the country. Bhavani Sagar dam is constructed on Bhavani River, which is merely under the union of Moyar River. The dam is used to divert water to the Lower Bhavani Project Canal.

The biggest dams in India

The Koyna Hydroelectric Project is the largest completed hydroelectric power plant of India It is a complex project consisting of total four dams with the largest Dam built on Koyna River known as Koyna Dam hence the name Koyna Hydroelectric project. The total Installed capacity of the project is 1,920 MW. The project consists of 4 stages of power generation. Due to the project’s electricity generating potential the Koyna River is considered as the life line of Maharashtra.

The biggest dams in India

The Idukki Dam, located in Kerala, India, is a 168.91 m (554 ft) tall arch dam. The dam stands between the two mountains – Kuravanmala (839) m and Kurathimala (925)m. It was constructed and is owned by the Kerala State Electricity Board. It supports a 780 MW hydroelectric power station.

It is built on the Periyar River, in the ravine between the Kuravan and Kurathi Hills in Kerala, India. At 167.68 metres, it is one of the highest arch dams in Asia and third tallest dam in India.

Photo by http://www.kseb.in/ [CC-BY-SA-2.5-in (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5/in/deed.en)], via Wikimedia Commons.

The biggest dams in India

Krishna Raja Sagara, also popularly known as KRS, is the name of both a lake and the dam that causes it.Sir. Mokshagundam Visvesvarayya served as the chief engineer during the construction of this dam. The dam is named for the then ruler of the Mysore Kingdom, Krishnaraja Wodeyar IV [Photo by Amarrg at the English language Wikipedia [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)], from Wikimedia Commons]

The biggest dams in India

The Mettur Dam is a large dam in India built in 1934.[1] It was constructed in a gorge, where the Kaveri River enters the plains. The dam is one of the oldest in India. The total length of the dam is 1,700 m (5,600 ft). [Photo by Praveen Kumar.R (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons]

The biggest dams in India

The Srisailam Dam is a dam constructed across the Krishna River at Srisailam in the Kurnool district in the state of Andhra Pradesh in India and is the second largest capacity hydroelectric project in the country. The dam was constructed in a deep gorge in the Nallamala Hills, 300 m (980 ft) above sea level. It is 512 m (1,680 ft) long, 145 m (476 ft) high and has 12 radial crest gates. It has a reservoir of 800 km2 (310 sq mi). [Photo by Chintohere (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons]

The biggest dams in India

The Banasura Sagar Dam is located 21 km from Kalpetta, in Wayanad District of Kerala in the Western Ghats. It is the largest earthen dam in India and the second largest in Asia. [Photo by Challiyan (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons]

 

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