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1000-year old inscription stone bears earliest reference to Bengaluru

Posted by Admin on December 4, 2012

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/bangalore/1000-year-old-inscription-stone-bears-earliest-reference-to-Bengaluru/articleshow/17446311.cms?

By , TNN | Dec 2, 2012, 02.11 AM IST

BANGALORE: Begur, a village off the Bangalore-Hosur highway, has seen rapid growth in the past few years thanks to its proximity to IT companies in Electronics City. Property values have multiplied, with residential layouts, high-rise apartments and malls coming up near the once-sparsely populated village. The proposed Metro connectivity heralds further prospects for the region.

Amid all this development lies neglected in theheart of the village a precious inscription stone, said to over 1,000 years old. It bears the earliest reference to the name ‘Bengaluru’.

The stone, dating back to around 890 AD, was found at the Parvathi Nageshwara temple. Written in Halegannada (ancient Kannada), it mentions ‘Bengaluru Kadana’ (battle of Bengaluru) that took place between the Gangas (Jains) and the Nolambas (Shaivites).

When the Nolamba army attacked Begur, the Ganga administrator Nagattara was killed in the battle. It was a significant turning point in the history of Bangalore, as it led to the eventual decline of Jain kings and the rise of the Shaivites. Thereafter, Shaiva settlements and temples came up in Bangalore, including the famous Someshawara temple in Ulsoor, according to SK Aruni, deputy director, Indian Council of Historical Research (ICHR), Bangalore Regional Centre.

The inscription seems to refute the popular ‘Benda Kalooru’ theory behind the origin of the name ‘Bengaluru.’ While the boiled beans anecdote relates to Hoysala king Veera Ballala’s regime in 1120 AD, and modern Bangalore was built by Kempegowda I in the 1530s. But the Begur inscription indicates that a settlement called ‘Bengaluru’ existed much before that, as early as 890 AD.

This has been recorded in the ‘Epigraphia of Carnatica,’ compiled by the Mysore archaeological department. Even though the Begur stone was identified and recorded in 1915 itself, no efforts have been made to preserve it. It lies against a compound wall in the Parvathi Nageshwara temple. Several other stones (veeragallus) are lying along beside, cracked in two pieces, echoing the tales of battles bygone.

“Some pillars inside the ancient temple are gradually sliding and caving in. The government should take immediate steps to preserve the temple and the monuments,” said Venkatesh, a villager who is also a member of the Rajagopura Construction Committee. The committee, formed by locals, raises funds from devotees and is building four Rajagopuras (high towers) around the temple. The construction in the premises poses further threat to the inscription. There should be care taken that the new concrete cement towers don’t ruin the beauty of the temple.

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Posted in Ancient Architecture, Bengaluru, Hindu Empire, India Forgotten, Rated R, Truthout Articles | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on 1000-year old inscription stone bears earliest reference to Bengaluru

Where does Bangalore’s power come from?

Posted by Admin on November 12, 2012

http://bangalore.citizenmatters.in/articles/view/4648-bescoms-power-sources

Bangalore had been reeling under a power shortage until recently. The city alone consumes about a third of the state’s total power. What are Bangalore’s power sources?

By Navya P K
06 Nov 2012, Citizen Matters

For over a month, there have been reports about power shortage in the city. Early October, BESCOM had contemplated power cuts for industries, but later changed the plan when rains started.

Currently, the city has shortage of around 100 MW daily, which is only less than 5% of its total requirement, says P Manivannan, MD of BESCOM [1]. The shortage for entire BESCOM area is upto 600 MW. Manivannan says, “The shortage cannot be quantified, but varies from 0-600 MW through the day depending on wind and other sources. We are able to handle it, and are not contemplating any load shedding for the city.”

Bangalore’s daily power demand is about 2300 MW (Mega Watt). That is, 2300 MW of power is transmitted throughout the day to the city on average (there are sharp differences in peak and non-peak hour consumption though). Bangalore consumes about one-third of the state’s total power. Karnataka‘s average demand is 6000 MW per day.

Pic: wikimediacommons

Overall, Bangalore consumes 42 Million Units (MU) energy per day, as opposed to state’s 140 MU. The transmission of 2300 MW through the day, leads to consumption of 42 MU of energy.

What are our power sources?

Bangalore is powered by the same grid that supplies to the entire state – there are no specific sources for Bangalore alone. The sources include hydel, thermal and non-conventional sources like wind and sun. The state also gets power from Central Generating Stations (CGS) like Neyveli Lignite Corporation, Kaiga Atomic Power Station in North Karnataka etc. Together, the sources have the maximum capacity to produce 12,000 MW of power, but actual generation is about 6000 MW and the extent of generation from each source varies through the day. Major sources are the state’s own hydel and thermal power stations.

Hydel power:

The state has over 15 hydel power stations – Shivanasamudra, Sharavathy and Bhadra are some of them. Though hydel power is a major part of state’s power, BESCOM gets only a small share of it. The amount of hydel power allocation is fixed for ESCOMs (Electricity Supply Companies).

BESCOM gets 12% of state’s hydel power for its entire area which also includes Tumkur, Chitradurga, Davanagere etc (not just Bangalore). Because of this low dependency on hydel power, poor monsoon rains do not hinder power supply to Bangalore as much.

Thermal power:

Thermal power comes from coal, gas and diesel stations. Raichur and Bellary Thermal Power Stations (RTPS and BTPS), and Yelahanka Diesel Generating Station (YDGS) are the state’s major thermal stations. Unlike hydel power, thermal power is stable as long as there is no shortage of coal/diesel.

Central Generating Stations (CGS):

CGS are thermal/nuclear stations. The stations are maintained by central government, and each state gets a specified share of the power generated. The state in which the station is located, will get majority of the power while neighbouring states will get a smaller share. Karnataka gets about 1000 MW from CGS, on average.

Non Conventional Energy Projects (NCEPs):

This power is produced not by government agencies, but by Independent Power Producers (IPPs). NCE sources mainly are wind, sun, biomass etc. Wind generation is a major part of NCEPs, but depends on wind availability. While IPPs like Tata BP Solar exclusively generates solar power, much of NCE is generated in factories as by-product.

For instance, in sugar and steel factories, while production process goes on, power can be generated simultaneously. The factories use part of this power for themselves, and sell the excess to the state. Udupi Power Corporation Ltd (UPCL), a major IPP, produces power from imported coal.

How power reaches Bangalore

Three agencies are involved in the procurement, transmission and supply of power, before it reaches consumers. Karnataka Power Corporation Ltd (KPCL) is the state agency that gets power from different generating stations. KPCL also buys power from other states when required.

Another agency, Karnataka Power Transmission Corporation Ltd (KPTCL) is in charge of transmitting power to different ESCOMs, including BESCOM. Once it gets the power from KPTCL, BESCOM’s local network supplies it to consumers.

All of this is co-ordinated by KPTCL’s State Load Despatch Centre (SLDC). ESCOMs inform SLDC about their power requirement forecast for the next day, 24 hours earlier. Similarly, KPCL informs SLDC of its generation forecast, a day before. Depending on this, the total power is distributed among each ESCOM for the next day. Demand and supply varies through the day, and SLDC maintains real-time data on this.

06 Nov 2012

Navya P K is Senior Staff Journalist at Citizen Matters.

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Apaulogy: Where art meets cartoon

Posted by Admin on June 1, 2012

http://in.lifestyle.yahoo.com/photos/apaulogy-where-art-meets-cartoon-slideshow/apaulogy-photo-1334593973.html

Apaulogy: Where art meets cartoon

Take a walk by Richards Park in Bangalore, and you’ll stumble upon a most curious gallery that will lure you inside with its funny sketches of a man on a wobbly bicycle and a policeman with ballooning shorts. I followed my feet to find inside a treasure-trove of the city’s collective memories. Apaulogy, the gallery, is a showcase of artist Paul Fernandes’ work as he recaptures the Bangalore of ‘60s and ‘70s – when it was still a sleepy little town. What makes it absolutely delightful is that Paul’s illustrations of the city’s history are in the form of cartoons.

Apaulogy

Artist Paul Fernandes with a cut-out of a policeman from the 1960’s. The official police uniform included shorts starched so stiff they were nicknamed parachutes, and a well-oiled moustache on a Rs. 5 maintenance-allowance.

Apaulogy

Paul Fernandes with Jatin Prabhu and Mona Weber, the gallery’s charming curators who will take you through the time-machine of Paul’s sketches, back to a more comic and peaceful Bangalore.

Apaulogy

Walk through the warm spaces of Apaulogy, step into a picture and travel back in time. If you’re lucky you’ll even bump into the artist on many of his (mis)adventures!

Apaulogy

A music series.

Apaulogy

The hilarious Shine Boards – a collection of misspelt sign-boards across the country that will leave you in splits.

Apaulogy

Praise for Paul’s work.

Apaulogy

Paul’s gallery Apaulogy is located near Richards Park, in Bangalore.

Apaulogy

India Coffee House, MG Road, where the coffee cups were always full and the conversation never ran out.

Apaulogy

Pedestrians at the risk of early learners at the Bangalore Driving School.

Apaulogy

Koshy’s, an old favourite, hasn’t changed much. Unfazed by posh neighbours like the Hard Rock café, it is abuzz with endless energy fuelled cups of tea and homemade sandwiches.

Apaulogy

A boisterous Mangalorean wedding: food, high spirits, and a veritable jewel-box of characters that belong to every Indian family.

Apaulogy

Plaza theatre that once screened the latest films in Bangalore is now the entrance to Namma Metro.

Apaulogy

In simpler times, when crimes were more innocent.

Apaulogy

In Pub City, Bangalore, Dewars Bar was the most popular watering hole. The name of the bar is apparently a play on Devarajan, the owner of the bar and Dewar’s whiskey.

Apaulogy

The BRV went from British armoury to premier movie hall that screened all the James Bond films. However, when they began to lose their audience to competition from other theatres, they began to screen racier films, with women doing cabarets. In ’77 a 20 ft. cut-out of a Japanese woman in a bikini took the city by surprise. But despite the collective shock at such a brazen image, Bangaloreans of the time were too laid-back to organize a hartal or protest.

Apaulogy

Posted in Bengaluru, India Forgotten, Picturesque | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Apaulogy: Where art meets cartoon