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World’s longest suspension bridges

Posted by Admin on June 4, 2012

http://in.finance.yahoo.com/photos/world-s-longest-suspension-bridges-slideshow/yangluo-bridge-photo-1337682916.html

Yangluo_Bridge

Yangluo Bridge

With a main span of 1,280 metres (4,200 ft), it is tied with the Golden Gate Bridge for the ninth longest suspension bridge in the world.

By Bighandking [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons.

Golden gate

Golden Gate Bridge

The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate, the opening of the San Francisco Bay into the Pacific Ocean. It has been declared one of the modern Wonders of the World by the American Society of Civil Engineers. The Frommers travel guide considers the Golden Gate Bridge “possibly the most beautiful, certainly the most photographed, bridge in the world”.

By Aslak Raanes from Trondheim, Norway (Flickr) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)%5D via Wikimedia Commons

Verrazano-Narrows_Bridge

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge

The bridge furnishes a critical link in the local and regional highway system. Since 1976, it has been the starting point of the New York City Marathon.[4] The bridge marks the gateway to New York Harbor; all cruise ships and most container ships arriving at the Port of New York and New Jersey must pass underneath the bridge and thus must be built to accommodate the clearance under the bridge.

By Ibagli (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons .

Tsing_Ma_Bridge

Tsing_Ma_Bridge

The bridge was named after two of the islands at its ends, namely Tsing Yi and Ma Wan . It has two decks and carries both road and rail traffic, which also makes it the largest suspension bridge of this type.

By [2] ([1]) [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons.

Jiangyin_Yangtze

Jiangyin Suspension Bridge

It connects the cities of Jiangyin and Jingjiang. The main span of the bridge is 1,385 metres (4,544 ft) meters long, making it the sixth-longest span suspension bridge in the world.

By Yawn823 at en.wikipedia. Later version(s) were uploaded by Masterdudeyo at en.wikipedia. (Transferred from en.wikipedia) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

Humber_Bridge

Humber Bridge

The Humber Bridge, near Kingston upon Hull, England, is a 2,220 m (7,283 ft) single-span suspension bridge, which opened to traffic on 24 June 1981. It is the fifth-largest of its type in the world.

By Lee Jackson (Own work (Photograph taken by myself)) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Runyang_Bridge

Runyang Bridge

The Runyang Bridge is a large bridge complex that crosses the Yangtze River in Jiangsu Province, China, downstream of Nanjing. The complex consists of two major bridges that link Zhenjiang on the south bank of the river and Yangzhou on the north. The bridge is part of the Beijing-Shanghai Expressway.

By Andy Zang (originally posted to Panoramio) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons.

GreatBeltBridge

Great belt bridge

The Great Belt Fixed Link (Danish: Storebæltsforbindelsen) is the fixed link between the Danish islands of Zealand and Funen across the Great Belt. It consists of a road suspension bridge and railway tunnel between Zealand and the island Sprogo, as well as a box girder bridge between Sprogo and Funen

By Tone V. V. Rosbach Jensen [CC-BY-SA-2.5 (www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], via Wikimedia Commons.

Xihoumen_Bridge

Xihoumen Bridge

The 5.3-kilometre-long suspension bridge connection has a 2.6-kilometre-long main bridge with a central span of 1,650 metres.

By Siyuwj (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons.

Akashi-Kaikyo_Bridge

Akashi Bridge

Also known as the Pearl Bridge, it has the longest central span of any suspension bridge,[2] at 1,991 metres (6,532 ft). It is located in Japan and was completed in 1998.

Before the Akashi Kaikyō Bridge was built, ferries carried passengers across the Akashi Strait in Japan. This dangerous waterway often experiences severe storms and, in 1955, two ferries sank in the strait during a storm, killing 168 people. The ensuing shock and public outrage convinced the Japanese government to develop plans for a suspension bridge to cross the strait.

Photo by Fotograf: Marcus Tschaut

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Save water: Take a pledge

Posted by Admin on March 22, 2012

http://in.lifestyle.yahoo.com/save-water-simple-ideas-cut-water-wastage-home-033025552.html

By Mdhil | Mdhil – 8 hours ago

On World Water Day, mDhil puts together some efficient ways of cutting down water usage. Adopt what suits you best, and play your part in conserving water.

Conservation of water is an essential practice today, whether or not you’re having water troubles at the moment. Simple changes can help save gallons of water a day. So make these changes and help conserve water.

  1.  
    • Washing veggies and fruits: Soak fruits and vegetables in a pot of water instead of putting them under running water to wash them.
    • Water plants with water used to wash them: When you’re done with soaking your fruits and veggies, don’t throw the water down the drain, instead use it to water indoor plants.
    • Don’t leave the tap open while brushing your teeth: Well, you’ve heard this one many times before. While brushing your teeth, wet the brush and turn off the tap. If you keep the tap running, you’re bound to waste litres of water in a week. Try and get your family to practice this too.
    • Conserve water while washing dishes: When you wash your dishes put a stopper to the sink drain and fill it with water. When all the dishes have been scrubbed, rinse them of in that water.
    • Get your toilet fixed: If you’re toilet is running, get it fixed. It’s most likely a part of the flapper that’s causing the leak, adjust it; if that doesn’t work, get a plumber.
    • Get any other leakage fixed, too:The same applies to any leaking tap around the house… Make sure you get them fixed. All they might need is a new washer, and that isn’t too expensive. Also, look for any leaking pipes around the house.
    • Soak pans before washing them: Soak pots and pans in water after use. This will save water while you’re trying to scrub off later on.
    • Shorten your shower: Try and reduce your showering time. One way to cut down on your water usage, is to turn of the shower while soaping your body and shampooing your hair. Ask your family to adopt this practice, too. Better still, install water-saving shower-heads. They’ll save you loads of water.
    • Defrost in the microwave: You don’t need to use running water to defrost frozen food. Instead stick it in the microwave for defrosting, or remove your frozen food and leave it out in advance.
    • Use your washing machine only for full loads: If you use a washing machine, only wash full loads of laundry at a time. Also, if you’re shopping for a washing machine, experts are of the opinion that top-loading machines use more water than front-loading ones. So you might be better off buying the latter.
    • Don’t use the toilet as an ashtray or wastebasket: Every time you flush a cigarette butt, tissue or any other piece of trash, you waster tonnes of water.
    • Rinse your razor in a mug: To rinse off your razor, either fill the sink with a few inches of warm water or a mug. This will rinse your razor just as well as running water, with far less waste of water.
    • Instead of running water, use a broom to clean your driveways and corridors. You can wash them with water every once in while though.
    • Don’t run the hose to wash your car: To clean your car or bike, use a bucket of soapy water. After that’s done, dip a sponge in clean water and wipe off soap. This way you’ll save litres of water.

Photograph via sxc.hu

Also check out:

Water facts and factoids on World Water Day – visit the Y! Lifestyle homepage for more on water.

 

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Water Statistics: For Food Production

Posted by Admin on March 22, 2012

http://in.lifestyle.yahoo.com/check-out-how-much-water-is-needed-to-produce-your-food.html

By AFP Relax News | Yahoo Lifestyle Entertainment – 8 hours ago

(Relaxnews) – World Water Day celebrates its 19th edition on March 22 and will be themed around water and food security.

At a time when drought, food and water scarcity are devastating parts of the world — particularly the developing areas — water advocates are pushing the notion of measuring your water footprint.

Aside from the water used for drinking, cooking, and washing, a major part of a consumer’s water footprint also involves the virtual or embedded water needed to produce a product.

For example, it takes about 1,500 liters of water to produce 1 kg of wheat, and about 10 times more to produce 1 kg of beef. That translates to 7,000 liters of water for steak dinner.

Check out how much water is needed to produce your meal in the list provided below by the United Nations for World Water Day:

Cereal, 1 cup = 130 liters
Orange Juice, 1 cup =170 L
Coffee, 1 cup = 140 L
Cheese, 1 portion = 250 L
Rice, 100 g = 140 L
Milk, 1 glass = 200 L
Tea, 1 cup = 35 L
Sugar, 1 piece = 10.5 L
Lettuce, 1 kg = 130 L
Apple/Pear, 1, 70= L
Chicken meat, 150 g = 615 L
Pork meat, 150 g, 690 L
Egg, 1, 135 L
Banana, 1, 70 L
Olives, 100 g = 250 L
Oats, 100g = 237 L
Onions, 100g = 17 L
Soybeans, 100g, = 275 L
Pineapple, 100g = 42 L
Chocolate, 100g = 2,400 L
Cucumber, 100 g = 24 L
Grapes, 100 g = 45.5 L
Lemon, 100 g = 34 L
Margarita Pizza = 1,216 L
Hamburger = 2,400 L

Today is World Water Day – did you know drinking water can stave off diabetes and the most popular 7 myths about drinking water? More on our Health & Fitness page!

 

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Maasai Mara – The Greatest Wildlife Spectacle on Earth

Posted by Admin on January 28, 2012

http://in.lifestyle.yahoo.com/masai-mara—the-greatest-wildlife-spectacle-on-earth.html?page=all

The Maasai Mara National Reserve in Kenya is witness to the most spectacular wildlife migration on earth. Wildlife photographer KALYAN VARMA captures the poetic beauty of the Mara in monotone.

By Kalyan Varma | Yahoo Lifestyle Entertainment – Tue 24 Jan, 2012 4:25 PM IST

(All photographs © KALYAN VARMA. Reproduced with exclusive permission)

© KALYAN VARMAA herd of African elephants under a dramatic sky makes for an imposing sight. © KALYAN VARMA

© KALYAN VARMA

Black rhino in Maasai Mara. Africa has two species of rhinoceros — the White or Square-lipped Rhino and the Black or Hook-lipped Rhino. Both are highly endangered and protected in Africa, though many still fall to hunters. Rhinos are poached for their horns, which are believed to possess aphrodisiac properties. The horn, which is in fact made of matted hair-like tissue, fetches insanely huge prices in the black markets of China and Southeast Asia. Rightly, conservationists believe that for the killing to stop, the buying must first be stopped. © KALYAN VARMA

© KALYAN VARMA

“The tree where man was born.” The continuity of the savanna, the great grassy plain of the Masai Mara, is broken by these hardy acacia trees. © KALYAN VARMA
© KALYAN VARMA

Three cheetah siblings, known locally as Honey’s Boys, bring down a wildebeest. The migration is eagerly awaited by lions, cheetahs, leopards and hyenas, for it brings a treasure trove of food for them. Most wildebeest calve on the way to the Mara and the young ones become easy prey for opportunistic predators. © KALYAN VARMA

© KALYAN VARMA

Cape Buffalo in Maasai Mara. Among the most impressive of herbivores, buffaloes are strong and formidable. They are known to be unpredictable and aggressive, often chasing away lions and other predators. Big game hunters of yore wrote that bullets ricocheted off the animal’s great horns. © KALYAN VARMA

© KALYAN VARMATwo zebra strike a pose in Maasai Mara, watched by an oxpecker, a bird that frequently follows grazing animals seeking out insects in their skin. Of the three species of zebra in Africa, this (the Plains Zebra) is the most common. The other two — the Grevy’s Zebra and the Mountain Zebra — are endangered. © KALYAN VARMA

© KALYAN VARMAElephants in the Maasai Mara. African elephants are larger than Asian elephants. There are two recognized species of African elephants — the African Bush Elephant shown here and the smaller African Forest Elephant, which is found in the rainforests of the Congo. © KALYAN VARMA 

© KALYAN VARMA

A giraffe stands in the shade of an acacia tree in the Maasai Mara. Giraffes, the tallest land animals (adult males are up to 20 feet tall), are among the residents of the Mara. © KALYAN VARMA

© KALYAN VARMAThe alpha male of the marsh pride, this African lion represents the majesty that has so often translated to myth and legend. Lions once ranged all over Africa and West Asia including India. Today, they are restricted to pockets in Africa and one subspecies is limited to a small sanctuary in Gujarat. Wild lions were mercilessly hunted across Africa and now remain relatively safe only in the great wildlife reserves. © KALYAN VARMA

© KALYAN VARMA
A lone zebra stands out against a sea of wildebeest as the herd, which mixes freely, prepares for the crossing. Zebra and wildebeest usually coexist peacefully and will alert each other to the presence of predators. © KALYAN VARMA

© KALYAN VARMA

Wildebeest drink before they ready for the crossing. The river teems with crocodiles hungrily awaiting the passage of the herd. Many wildebeest and zebra fall prey to the waiting predators but most will make it and go on to the relative safety of the grasslands where the Circle of Life continues to be enacted. Other predators such as lions, hyenas, cheetahs and leopards will stalk the sick, the infirm and the unfortunate. © KALYAN VARMA
© KALYAN VARMA

The herd picks the narrowest bend in the swiftly flowing river to make the crossing. The cloud of dust kicked up by the hooves of so many zebra and wildebeest can be seen from many miles away. This is one of the most dramatic events of the Great Migration and has been ritually documented by filmmakers and wildlife photographers through the years. © KALYAN VARMA 

© KALYAN VARMA

A cryptically patterned sea of ungulate bodies kicks out of the water as a mixed herd of zebra and wildebeest successfully makes the crossing. The Migration is a recently relative phenomenon, dating back to the 1950s when wildebeest behavior showed a marked change following an outbreak of the rinderpest epidemic. © KALYAN VARMA

© KALYAN VARMA

A small band of zebras makes the crossing. At the end of the season, the herds will make a return journey, following a southeasterly trajectory from the Maasai Mara in Kenya back to the Serengeti in Tanzania. © KALYAN VARMA

© KALYAN VARMA

A close-up of an African elephant (Loxodonta africana) shows its tough wrinkled hide, which earned it the moniker ‘pachyderm’ (Greek for “thick skin”). Unlike in Asian elephants, female Aftican elephants also bear tusks. Like Asian elephants, African elephants continue to be hunted by poachers who supply the illegal trade in ivory.  © KALYAN VARMA. Experience more wildlife images like these at Kalyan Varma’s website.

 

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The Kodak moment fades

Posted by Admin on January 23, 2012

http://in.news.yahoo.com/photos/the-kodak-moment-fades-1327072573-slideshow/

Eastman Kodak Co, the photography icon that invented the hand-held camera filed for bankruptcy protection. Some key events in the history of the company that brought photography to the masses:

Eastman Kodak Co, the photography icon that invented the hand-held camera filed for bankruptcy protection. Some key events in the history of the company that brought photography to the masses:

In 1881, George Eastman and businessman Henry Strong form a partnership called the Eastman Dry Plate Company. The name Kodak is born and the Kodak camera is placed on the market, with the slogan: “You Press The Button – We Do The Rest.”

In 1896 – the 100,000th Kodak camera is manufactured and the pocket Kodak camera sold for $5 and in 1900 the Brownie camera is introduced which sells for $1.

In 1929 – Kodak introduces its first motion picture film designed for making movies with sound tracks.

In 1932 – George Eastman, suffering from a painful spinal disorder, commits suicide with a bullet to the heart. He leaves a note that says: “My work is done. Why wait?”

In 1975 – Kodak invents the world’s first digital camera, a toaster-sized image sensor that captured rough hues of black and white.

In 1997 – Kodak stock touches all-time high of $94.38 and closes at $0.55 on 18th January, 2012, on the New York Stock Exchange.

By the end 2010, Kodak has equivalent of 18,800 full-time employees. Its digital camera market share has falls to 7 per cent, ranking seventh behind Canon Inc, Sony Corp, Nikon Corp.

In 2012 – Kodak files a lawsuit against Apple Inc accusing it of infringing four patents related to digital camera images. Kodak later also files patent infringement suits against Fujifilm Holdings Corp and Samsung Electronics Co Ltd.

 

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Top 10 inspiring women in the world

Posted by Admin on January 23, 2012

http://in.lifestyle.yahoo.com/photos/top-10-inspiring-women-in-the-world-1327031313-slideshow/

If you’re feeling down in the dumps or suffering from a serious lack of motivation, check out this list of 10 women who will leave you feeling inspired, confident, and ready to make your life the best that it can be.

Mother Teresa

The example set by Mother Teresa shows that no matter how humble your beginnings, you still have the capacity to help others less fortunate than you. After a life dedicated to charity and humanitarian work, she is regarded as one of the most selfless people to have ever lived, and her efforts were recognised in 1979 when she won the Nobel Peace Prize. However, one of the most admirable things about Mother Teresa is that she wasn’t doing it for the recognition – she spent nearly 30 years of her life helping others before anybody even knew who she was.

Joan of Arc

Stand up for what you believe in” is a great phrase to live by, and nobody did this more so than Joan of Arc. She campaigned for the instatement of the ‘true king’ to the French throne because she believed it was God’s will, and led the French armies in fighting their English invaders. At a time when a woman on the battlefield was unheard of she eventually led her army to victory, fearlessly fighting and eventually dying to defend her country and strong beliefs.

Marilyn Monroe

Norma Jean Baker, or ‘Marilyn Monroe’ as she is better known, made a hugely successful career out of her good looks and uncanny ability to understand what the world wanted to see. Despite her ditzy blonde image and demeanour, she knew exactly what she was doing and it’s no coincidence that she became as famous as she did. Not content to let leading men hog the spotlight, she took extensive acting lessons to improve herself, because in her opinion; “Women who seek to be equal with men lack ambition.”

Oprah Winfrey

Simply through being compassionate, caring and charitable, Oprah Winfrey has made an astronomically successful career for herself. She shot to fame as an interviewer when her ability to emotionally connect with her guests struck a chord with the American public, and since then has gone from strength to strength. In 2003 she became the first African-American woman to be classed as a billionaire, yet in true Oprah style shares her wealth with those who need it most, having personally donated over $300 million to charitable causes.

Amelia Earhart

Amelia Earhart’s is a story of both success and tragedy, full of adventuring and pioneering for women’s rights. She was the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic, and was rewarded with the Distinguished Flying Cross for her efforts – again, she was the first woman to receive this. While other women were being held back by a male dominated society, Amelia was soaring through the clouds, breaking records, and having the time of her life.

Billie Jean King

With 39 Grand Slam titles to her name and 6 separate spells as world number one, Billie Jean King is undoubtedly one of the greatest female tennis players to ever grace the game – however, it is her battle for equal rights for sporting women that she will be truly remembered for. In 1973 she took on and defeated self professed chauvinist Bobby Riggs in ‘The Battle of the Sexes’. A former world number one himself, Riggs’ defeat proved once and for all that women deserved both respect and equality in the world of sport.

J. K. Rowling

From single mother living on benefits to multi-millionaire author in the space of a few years; if ever you needed proof that you should follow your dreams, J. K. Rowling is just that. After multiple rejections from publishers she finally secured a print run of 1,000 copies for her first book, which you just might have heard of – Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. Fast forward a few years and the Harry Potter series has sold over 400,000 copies, spawned a whole film franchise, and almost single-handedly made reading cool again for kids.

Princess Diana

After marrying into the royal family, Princess Diana could simply have sat back and enjoyed a life of relaxation and luxury without a care in the world. However, she took it upon herself to use her celebrity status to help as many people as possible, becoming the figurehead for charity campaigns around the world. Someone who had everything and was eager to share it with is many people as possible, Diana was an inspiration to people in all walks of life, and her death was met with worldwide mourning.

Rosa Parks

Refusing to give up a seat on a bus may seem like a simple feat, but when Rosa Parks did it in 1955 it was nothing short of unheard of. As an African American, Parks was legally obliged to give up her seat at the request of a white person – something she simply wasn’t willing to do. The courage she showed in that instance sparked the civil rights movement in America, and her simple act of defiance changed the lives of millions of people.

Kelly Holmes

Kelly Holmes’ was a career full of set-backs and challenges, but one that ultimately had a happy ending. After years of trying for Olympic gold, her last chance came at the 2004 Games – a chance that was almost taken away from her by a leg injury. Despite suffering severe depression as a result of this, Kelly was able to battle through the injury through sheer determination, and ended up going above and beyond her wildest dreams by winning double Olympic gold in the 800m and 1500m.

 

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Gallery: The Splendor of the Orion Nebula

Posted by Admin on December 24, 2011

SPACE.com Staff
Date: 22 December 2011 Time: 09:27 PM ET

The Splendor of Orion: A Star Factory UnveiledCredit: NASA, ESA, M. Robberto (Space Telescope Science Institute/ESA) and the Hubble Space Telescope Orion Treasury Project TeamThis new Hubble image of the Orion Nebula shows dense pillars of gas and dust that may be the homes of fledgling stars, and hot, young, massive stars that have emerged from their cocoons and are shaping the nebula with powerful ultraviolet light.

The Splendor of Orion: A Star Factory Unveiled

Cosmic Bullets Pierce Space CloudCredit: Gemini ObservatoryThis composite image at infrared wavelengths shows the Orion nebula “bullets” as blue features and represents the light emitted by hot iron gas. The light from the wakes, shown in orange, is from excited hydrogen gas.

Each bullet is about ten times the size of Pluto’s orbit around the Sun and travels through the clouds at up to 250 miles (400 kilometers) per second-or about a thousand times faster than the speed of sound.

Cosmic Bullets Pierce Space Cloud

Famous Orion Nebula Closer Than Thought Credit: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSFTrigonometric Parallax method determines distance to star by measuring its slight shift in apparent position as seen from opposite ends of Earth’s orbit.

Famous Orion Nebula Closer Than Thought

Twin Stars Born 500,000 Years ApartCredit: NASA-JPL-STScI/David James.The two identical twin stars (inset) called Par 1802 appear as a single point of light, because they are so close to each other in the Orion Nebula (background).

Twin Stars Born 500,000 Years Apart

New Close-up Shows Binary Stars in Orion’s HeartCredit: nullLeft: Zooming into the center of the Orion star-forming region with the four bright Trapezium stars (Theta1 Orionis A-D). The dominant star is Theta1 Orionis C, which was imaged with unprecedented resolution with the VLT interferometer (lower right). Right: The orbit of the binary system (grey line). The size of the orbit of Jupiter around our sun is shown for comparison. Collage: MPIfR (Stefan Kraus), ESO, NASA,HST.

New Close-up Shows Binary Stars in Orion’s Heart

 ‘Space Jellyfish’ and Cosmic Blobs Seen by Hubble TelescopeCredit: NASA/ESA and L. Ricci (ESO)This new atlas features 30 proplyds, or protoplanetary discs, that were recently discovered in the majestic Orion Nebula using the Hubble Space Telescope.

'Space Jellyfish' and Cosmic Blobs Seen by Hubble Telescope

New Image Penetrates Heart of Orion NebulaCredit: ESO/J. Emerson/VISTA. Acknowledgment: Cambridge Astronomical Survey UnitThis wide-field view of the Orion Nebula (Messier 42), lying about 1350 light-years from Earth, was taken with the VISTA infrared survey telescope at ESO’s Paranal Observatory in Chile. The new telescope’s huge field of view allows the whole nebula and its surroundings to be imaged in a single picture and its infrared vision also means that it can peer deep into the normally hidden dusty regions and reveal the curious antics of the very active young stars buried there.

New Image Penetrates Heart of Orion Nebula

Hot New Stars Take Center Stage in Cosmic PhotoCredit: NASA/JPL-CaltechA colony of hot, young stars is stirring up the cosmic scene in this new picture from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope released on April 1, 2010. Full story.

 Hot New Stars Take Center Stage in Cosmic Photo

Star-Formation Details Seen in New ImagesCredit: ESA/LFI & HFI ConsortiaAn active star-formation region in the Orion nebula, as seen by Planck. This image covers a region of 13×13 degrees. It is a three-color combination constructed from three of Planck’s nine frequency channels: 30, 353 and 857 GHz.

Star-Formation Details Seen in New Images

Young Stars Blamed for Space Cloud RipplesCredit: NASA-JPL & Caltech, ESO-VISTA [Full Story]Top: near-infrared image of the Orion nebula. The massive stars are in the bright region. Bottom: Zoom on the region of the waves shown at mid-infrared (green), and radio wavelengths (red). The mid-infrared component shows the emission of warm small dust particles, while the radio emission comes from the cold gas. Each inset corresponds to a different velocity of the gas, observed with the IRAM 30m radio-telescope.

Young Stars Blamed for Space Cloud Ripples

Orion NebulaCredit: ESO and Igor ChekalinThis new image of the Orion Nebula was captured using the Wide Field Imager camera on the MPG/ESO 2.2-meter telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile.

Orion Nebula

Orion Knows How to Turn on the FIreworks!Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASAThis NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image of the Orion Nebula shows the spectacular region around an object known as Herbig-Haro 502, a very small part of the vast stellar nursery. The glow of the nebula fills the image and, just left of center, a star embedded in a pinkish glow can be also seen. This object, Herbig-Haro 502, is an example of a very young star surrounded by the cloud of gas from which it formed.

Orion Knows How to Turn on the FIreworks!

Orion, Brightest Winter ConstellationCredit: Starry Night SoftwareOrion is the brightest and most beautiful of the winter constellations, full of fascinating objects for the curious skygazer.

Orion, Brightest Winter Constellation

SOFIA Image of Orion NebulaCredit: SOFIA image: James De Buizer/NASA/DLR/USRA/DSI/FORCAST; Spitzer image: NASA/JPLThis image compares two infrared pictures of the heart of the Orion nebula captured by the FORCAST camera on the SOFIA airborne observatory’s telescope with a wider image of the same area from NASA’s Spitzer space telescope.

SOFIA Image of Orion Nebula

Orion from Viking ViewCredit: P-M Hedén/TWANSkywatcher Per-Magnus Heden wondered if the Vikings gazed at the same starry sky when he took this photo in Feb. 2011.

Orion from Viking View

Orion Unveiled: Spitzer Telescope Spies Nebula’s Infrared SecretsCredit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/S.T. Megeaty (Univ. of Toledo,OH).This infrared image from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope shows the Orion nebula, the closest massive star-making factory to Earth.

Orion Unveiled: Spitzer Telescope Spies Nebula’s Infrared Secrets

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Widescreen: Longest bridges in world

Posted by Admin on July 2, 2011

http://in.news.yahoo.com/big-picture–longest-bridges-in-world.html;_ylt=AvH.UX7Nt7IR0e6V3_T2.tdh_t5_;_ylu=X3oDMTNoY2k3cG9zBHBrZwNjOGNlNmI0YS0yMzVlLTM0YjItYmU1My02Mjc5MTMwZjk0ZTIEcG9zAzIEc2VjA01lZGlhRmVhdHVyZWRDYXJvdXNlbAR2ZXIDMThmZmQxNTQtYTQ3Yy0xMWUwLThjZWUtODNhYThmNTMwNWVj;_ylg=X3oDMTMyczVlMjA2BGludGwDaW4EbGFuZwNlbi1pbgRwc3RhaWQDNDM0NTQ1YTMtYzU2NC0zOTZjLWJlYjItNWY3YTYzMjQ3NjkzBHBzdGNhdANob21lfHdpZGVzY3JlZW4EcHQDc3RvcnlwYWdl;_ylv=3

The world’s longest cross-sea bridge, spanning 36.48 kilometers across the mouth of the Jiaozhou Bay in China’s eastern Shandong province, opened to traffic four years after construction started. Here’s a peek into some of the world’s longest bridges.

Lake Pontchartrain Causeway

Located in Louisiana, United States, the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, consists of two parallel bridges that run parallel to each other. The bridges are supported by 9,500 concrete pilings and spans over 38.35 kilometres. The southern terminus of the Causeway is in Metairie, Louisiana, a suburb of New Orleans. The northern terminus is at Mandeville, Louisiana.

Donghai Bridge

Completed on December 10, 2005, the Donghai Bridge has a total length of 32.5 kilometres and connects Shanghai to the Yangshan port in China. The ‘Donghai Bridge’ is popularly known as ‘The stone’.

Chesapeake Bay Bridge

The Chesapeake Bay Bridge is a four lane bridge that connects the Delmarva Peninsula’s Eastern Shore of Virginia with Virginia Beach and the metropolitan area of Hampton Roads, Virginia. The bridge has a total length of 37 kilometres.

Vasco da Gama Bridge

The Vasco da Gama Bridge is a cable bridge with a total length of 17.2 kilometres. The bridge was opened to traffic on 29 March, 1998. The bridge spans across the Tagus River near Lisbon, Portugal.

Penang Bridge

The Penang Bridge opened to traffic on September 14, 1985 and connects Gelugor in Penang island and Seberang Prai to mainland Malaysia. The total length of the bridge is 13.5 kilometres.

Rio-Niteroi Bridge

The Rio-Niteroi Bridge is a box girder bridge that connects the cities of Rio de Janeiro and Niteroi. The bridge opened on March 4, 1974 and the total length of the bridge is 13 kilometres.

Confederation Bridge

The 12.9 kilometre long bridge opened on 31 May 1997, connecting the Prince Edward Island with New Brunswick, Canada. The Confederation bridge is a two-lane highway toll bridge.

San Mateo-Hayward Bridge

Commonly known as the San Mateo Bridge, the San Mateo-Hayward Bridge connects San Francisco Peninsula with the East Bay. The total length of the bridge is 11.265408 kilometres.

Seven Mile Bridge

The Seven Mile Bridge is is located between the Gulf of Mexico and the Florida Strait. Finished in 1982 at a cost of $45 million, the Seven Mile Bridge connects city of Marathon in the Middle Keys of Florida to Little Duck Key in the Lower Keys of Florida.

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Reader, Interrupted

Posted by Admin on May 28, 2011

http://in.news.yahoo.com/blogs/opinions/reader-interrupted-070551236.html

By Sanjay Sipahimalani | Opinions – Fri, May 27, 2011

One of the aims of the novelist, writes John Gardner in his The Art of Fiction, is to create for the reader “a vivid and continuous dream”. Well, these days, I find that dream to be full of interruptions.

I’m not referring to doorbells, phone calls and mysterious thumps from next door. Rather, it’s the distraction caused by having access to the Internet. The lurking sense that there are e-mails to be checked, tweets to be followed, status updates to be noted, headlines to be scanned or new videos of Rebecca Black to be made fun of.

The ease with which all of this can be accomplished means that it’s a temptation to be constantly wrestled with, and more often than not, I find myself pinned to the ground. And the more often one enters that kinetic, frenetic arena, the more difficult it is to settle down for a period of sustained, single-minded attention.

Nicholas Carr, in his much-discussed The Shallows, maintains that the Web destroys focus, quoting neurological studies to prove that it rewires the brain. “Because it disrupts concentration,” he writes, “such activity weakens comprehension”. Concentration, comprehension: without these qualities, the act of reading is imperiled. Bandwidth comes at the expense of mindwidth.

As with others, there are two states I swing between when reading a novel. The first, of immersion: of being drawn into and inhabiting the author’s world, one that supplants ordinary laws of time and space. The other, of being aware that I am reading: of peripheral vision, of turning the pages and of occasionally checking to see how many more are left. Sadly, it’s the latter state that prevails and more and more nowadays. (The problem resolves itself if it’s a novel I dislike, in which case I simply skim.)

When much younger, this quality of immersion was so much more pronounced. Succumbing to one of his usual fits of nostalgia, Proust has written, “There are perhaps no days of our childhood we lived so fully as those we believe we left without having lived them, those we spent with a favorite book”. He goes on to state that memories of those times even bring alive the surroundings: “If we still happen today to leaf through those books of another time, it is for no other reason than that they are the only calendars we have kept of days that have vanished, and we hope to see reflected on their pages the dwellings and the ponds which no longer exist”. Every such book, then, becomes a diary of the past.

To return to the 21st century, there’s the added complication, as many have pointed out, that Web pages simply aren’t conducive to reading at length. Bite-sized pieces are all we absorb before clicking and moving on, and this habit can persist when we return to the printed page. (Paradoxically, though, it’s the Web that’s being credited with something of a revival of long-form journalism, be it through curation sites such as LongForm.org, save-for-later services such as Instapaper, or Kindle Singles. Content is selected, distractions are eliminated. Dedicated e-book readers, too, have that advantage — which is why I think the Kindle should simply do away with the rudimentary Web access it currently provides.)

Which leads to the speculation that, when it comes to the novel, we’ll return to the time of the Victorians, with authors writing in monthly installments that appear on e-readers and periodicals, subsequently being issued as one large, complete volume. James Buzard, MIT literature professor, makes this sound trendy when he says that such serials “encourage a different social engagement” with books,talking of it as a form of “viral marketing” where readers have the time to exchange views on the work in progress with each other and with the novelist. (“But, Charles, did you really have to let Little Nell die?”)

While we wait for these and other necessities-turned-virtues to materialise, I’m left with an immediate, unresolved problem. There are more than 150 unread pages of a book that I have to review, and if I persist in turning to one of the many screens that surround my life, I’m never going to meet the deadline.

Sanjay Sipahimalani is a writer with an advertising agency in Mumbai. His reviews are collected at Antiblurbs.

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Supermoon may cause natural disasters next week

Posted by Admin on March 12, 2011

http://in.news.yahoo.com/blogs/geewhiz/supermoon-may-cause-natural-disasters-next-week-20110309-020911-225.html

By Clint Thomas | Gee Whiz! – Wed, Mar 9, 2011 3:39 PM IST

On March 19th 2011, the moon will make its closest approach to Earth in almost 20 years, possibly triggering earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and other disasters.

The phenomenon, called lunar perigee or Supermoon, happens when the moon reaches its absolute closest point to Earth. On March 19, the natural satellite will be only 221,567 miles away from our planet.

There were Supermoons in 1955, 1974, 1992 and 2005, and these years had their share of extreme weather conditions, too. Although there are scientific laws that say the moon affects the Earth, it’s still ambiguous whether the lunar perigee and natural disasters is coincidence or not.

British freelance weatherman John Kettley was quoted as saying “A moon can’t cause a geological event like an earthquake, but it will cause a difference to the tide. If that combines with certain weather conditions, then that could cause a few problems for coastal areas.”

Neo Earth Close Approach Tables By NASA

 

While hoping for a non-disastrous ‘moon giant’, point your eyes and camera lenses toward the night sky on 19th. If the sky is clear, you’re gonna get an exceptional celestial treat.

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THE BENEFITS OF RAW HONEY

Posted by Admin on January 29, 2011

Honey in its natural raw state contains 2 predominant natural sugars (Fructose and Glucose) 11 enzymes, 14 minerals, 21 amino acids, all the vitamins that nutritionists consider necessary for health A, D, K, Rutin, Nicotinic acid, B vitamins, Thiamine, Riboflavin, Niacin, Pantothenic acid, Pyridoxine and Biotin as well as Ascorbid Acid (Vit. C.).

 

HONEY PROCESSING

 

Most honey sold today has been commercially processed, resulting in enzymes (which help digestion) and vitamins, being destroyed and protein (pollen) being removed. This processing involves heating and filtering through a cloth or fine filter paper. The end product will remain in a liquid state for a long period of time. When it finally starts to granulate, crystals will begin to form at the bottom of the jar, moving upwards (a sure sign of a refined and processed product, despite the label ‘Pure Honey’).

 

WHAT CAN RAW HONEY DO FOR YOU?

 

Raw Honey was and still is credited with marvelous curative powers. A whole book could be written on all the medicinal uses of honey, from thousands of years of folk medicine to the scientific of the present time.

In addition to its age-retarding properties raw honey has been proven to be from beneficial to extraordinary effective in the following:

 

* As honey is a pre-digested food (a process done by the bees) it enters the blood stream directly producing energy quickly, unlike refined sugar which has to be digested.

 

* Proline, an amino acid in Raw honey is the primary component in collagen. Collagen is the main structure in bones. (Proverbs 16.24ââ≠¬â•ˇhealth to the bones) Calcium is also found in two forms in Raw Honey.

 

* Increases Haemoglobin count and can prevent or cure Anaemia. It is rich in iron and copper.

 

* Is an excellent mild laxative, especially recommended as such for infants and children.

 

* Raw Honey will prevent and even cure Botulism Poisoning, because it contains an enzyme called Glucose Oxidase, (this enzyme is easily destroyed with heat). Botulism spores can only develop in the intestines of infants when chronically constipated.

 

* It has been shown to be useful in Rheumatic and Arthritic cinditions, especially in combination with Apple Cider Vinegar (Dr D.C. Jarvis).

 

* It has been used successful in the treatment of liver and kidney disorders, diseases of the respiratory and digestive tracts, weak heart action, infectious diseases, colds, insomnia, poor circulation, and bad complexion.

 

* It is not mere theory, but has been proved that bacteria cannot live in the presence of raw honey, for the reason that raw honey is an excellent source of potassium. The potassium draws from the bacteria the moisture which is essential to the very existence. A bacteriologist who did not believe this, after a series of tests discovered to his amazement that the disease germs he tested (typhoid, Bronco-pneumonia and Dysentery producing germs) were all killed off in the presence of raw honey.

 

* In this book Folk Medicine, Dr Jarvis an ear, nose and throat specialist reveals some startling facts about raw honey and honeycomb. He says the honeycomb is excellent for the treating of stuffy nose, nasal sinusitis and hay-fever. He always says that raw honey can produce healing for skin burns and is essential in the diet of children because it provides the composite of minerals needed for the growing body ( iron, copper, manganese, silica, chlorine, potassium, sodium, phosphorous, aluminium, magnesium, zinc, lead and sulphor ).

 

* Probably the most beneficial effect of pollen (contained in raw unfiltered honey) is that, taken internally it quickly produces the same anti-putrefactive effect as lactic foods and thus contributes to a healthy digestive system and good assimilation of nutrients absolute prerequisites for good health and long life.

 

Eating pollen rich raw honey causes rapid combustion, consuming fats which speed up the burning of fat, and continues through the bloodstream at a trickle stimulating the heart without harmful side effects.

 

Remind that every second we are getting closer to Aakhira….

 

Wonders of holy Neem

Neem is a multipurpose herb, which is recommended in every type of ailment. Following are the wonders of neem, which ayurveda has to offer to this world and modern life style of living.

 

Local action:

 

· Neem act as anti bacterial, anti parasitic, anti fungal, anti protozoal and anti viral thus helps in protection from all the microorganisms, which are always ready to invade in our body causing serious ailments.

 

· Local application of neem powder or neem oil has miraculous results. As it is a famous anti microbial herb, it renders all the microorganisms inactive therefore helping in proper healing of wound without causing any infections and septic conditions.

 

· Taking bath of neem leaves water is a very common sight in Indian homes that helps our body to counter mild infections, which our body might get in day-to-day activity.

 

· Its tropical application makes us relieved from acne, eczema and even ringworms

 

· In skin related diseases, neem works as blessing of God on mankind. It has an action on almost every kind of skin disease thus making its indication in eradicating every kind of itch, rash, infection and allergy.

 

· Neem water is extensively used in burn injuries, thus to protect them from any kind of infection and also promote healing.

 

· Neem oil is extensively used in hair fall and early graying of hairs with very satisfying results. It also find its application in dandruff and in lice growth

 

· Its local application on arthritic conditions like rheumatoid arthritis, gout, Osteoarthritis, lower back pain, and musculo skeletal pains is highly recommended with good results

 

Internal action:

 

· Due to presence of tickt rasa it is beneficial in indigestion, constipation and restoring taste of mouth.

 

· It helps in fighting with the intestinal worms there by act as a deworming agent

 

· It is highly recommended in hyperacidity and epigastric pain as it suppresses pitta that is the main culprit in the aggravation of such illness.

 

· Good results have also been seen in gastritis

 

· Widely and extensively used as blood purifier as it possess the properties like tickt rasa which helps in detoxifying any toxins floating in our blood stream which may lead to illness.

 

· It gives wonderful results in diabetes incipidus and diabetes mellitus due to presence of tickt rasa.

 

· It is very helpful in curing urinary tract infection

 

· It stimulates liver for proper functioning therefore helps in maintaining proper secretions of liver

 

· It acts on all kinds of skin disorders and provides great relief.

 

· It works as an anti inflammatory and pain relieving agent

 

· It also helps in suppressing extra heat generated in body due to any reason thus helps in maintaing normal condition in hyperthermia. Very useful in suppressing fever.

 

· Anti malarial action of neem has also been seen

 

· Since old times neem leaves have been used as an agent that helps in increasing vision as it helps in suppressing kapha disorders thus releasing congestion on eyeballs caused due to mucus accumulation in sinuses.

 

· Coughing is relieved by use of neem water

 

· It helps in reducing excess micturition (urination)

 

· It has given very good results in diseases like gonorrhea and syphilis.

 

· It works as an immunoboosting agent therefore making our immune system very strong and efficient to fight against any foreign invasion making our body strong and disease free

Heart Disease:Including high blood pressure, blood clots, cholesterol, and Arrhythmia/rapid heart beat.

 

Blood Disorders: Including poor circulation, blood poisoning, and kidney problems.

 

Digestive Disorders: Including heartburn/indigestion, peptic/duodenal ulcers, gastritis, and hemorrhoids.

 

Nervous Disorders: Including anxiety, epilepsy, and hives.

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