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Posts Tagged ‘Chennai’

Nature till I die

Posted by Admin on June 4, 2012

http://in.news.yahoo.com/photos/nature-till-i-die-slideshow/;_ylt=AggUbEpT.Sm0.xab.CfiKNfPfNx_;_ylu=X3oDMTN2cWhmZ2tnBG1pdANMYXRlc3QgbmV3cyBwaG90b3MEcGtnAzdhN2UwZjc1LTFkZTYtM2JiMy05MDhmLTg3NTIwNGNjNzY4ZARwb3MDMwRzZWMDdG9wc3RvcnlfZ2FsBHZlcgM0OTdjNzVmMi1hYmQ2LTExZTEtYjFjZi0xNTY4NjkzNjNiM2Q-;_ylg=X3oDMTJwaG9tNDFsBGludGwDaW4EbGFuZwNlbi1pbgRwc3RhaWQDMDFjYzgzYzMtZDY0Yi0zMDg2LTg0NTQtMmYzMWM2MWY0ZDU3BHBzdGNhdANhdXRvcwRwdANzcy1nYWxsZXJ5;_ylv=3

Nature till I die

My art and the environment, Yahoo’s original series tracks what loving the environment means for an ordinary person with extraordinary commitment. These are people who love an art form and from that vantage have explored the environment. In mainstream media, we hear too many ideological voices of activists, partisan NGOs and biased industry players, but sometimes it starts with what piques an individual’s curiosity. Today meet 18 year old Archith Sridhar. When he was 10, his mother caught him lovingly caressing a centipede on his palm, examining its glossy colors and its numerous legs. For him, this beautiful creature was fascinating – as was the injured migratory stork that he helped rescue and leave at the Blue Cross, an animal rescue centre. Leisure reading for him as a twelve-year-old was ‘Microcellular organisms’, a biggie with glossy illustrations. He’s currently pursuing a Bachelor’s in Veterinary Sciences in Pondicherry. The camera has been his favorite gadget – from a trip with family(much to his chagrin) to Bandhavgarh’s tigers to flying solo to Gir and Agumbe or enrolling as a docent at the Madras Crocodile Bank. Ask him what he wants to become – he is not sure. Ask him what he wants to do now – and he would probably pick up his Canon 7D and his backpack. Hear him tell you about his photos and experiences with passion, enthusiasm and humor.

Nature till I die

Tigress, Bandhavgarh: MP
This striped and endangered majesty of an animal is forever in conflict with human habitation. This picture to me perfectly captures that conflict. The tigress is stepping onto a dirt road criss-crossed with jeep tyre marks.

Nature till I die

Tarantula, Agumbe
Walking through Pit viper terrain, wading through a pond in shorts and floaters without a torch (I didn’t want to scare the tarantulas away), my group and I came here specifically to see these tarantulas creeping out of their nests burrowed into mud embankments.

Nature till I die

Spectacled cobra, Chennai
Snake hunting with the Irulas was an unforgettable experience and spotting this Spectacled Cobra made my day. My usual camera was at service and I had to make do with a point and shoot, and thus had to get really close to this guy for such a shot. The thrill of looking at a cobra in the wild was like a dream come true.

Nature till I die

Jaws III, Croc Bank: Chennai
Meet Jaws III, the largest captive saltwater croc at in India at over 18 feet. He is a massive and fierce dominant male who keeps complete control over his territory, even refusing to allow mating females into his murky waters. You wouldn’t want to meet him on a Sunday swim, snout to snout.

Nature till I die

Golden frog, Agumbe :Karnataka
The toughest customer – He kept jumping away, out of the line of my lens. Believe me, he almost missed his chance to be covered here, at Yahoo! He was the typical celeb guy being chased by this lens man. Had to crouch very low, get my camera a foot away from his eye level and click, using the flash.

Nature till I die

A Pair of Jungle babblers, Gir : Gujarat
What makes this photograph special for me is that one bird was grooming another. They looked like they were in love with each other, totally immersed in the mood of the moment. You take the pick on who the male is, and who the female is.

Nature till I die

Shield bug, Chennai
On a snake walk with Irulas, this flashy bug distracted me from my main quarry. Instead of looking for snakes, I began looking for more of these bugs. Little did I know then that they were capable of releasing pungent chemicals in self-defense. I am happy I did not have to find out the hard way.

Nature till I die

Indian scops owl, Gir, Gujarat
Perfectly blending with the bark, he was patiently posing for a long while. Unusually, instead of the animal tiring of me, it was my turn to walk away. I loved his expression and his patience.

Nature till I die

Moth in my backyard
I have been unable to identify this patterned moth, which I one day clicked in the backyard of my house. Note that it appears to have eyes, an open mouth and a flowing moustache – giving the appearance of a face looking at you. Imagine further, and you can see arms and a body to this creature.

Nature till I die

Web, Agumbe
Beautifully created, carefully designed and perfectly executed, this spider web is doomed to be destroyed for it fell right in the middle of a road entering the Agumbe Rainforest Research Station. The effort and toil of one whole night would be gone with the next motor vehicle.

Nature till I die

Peacock, Gir
My camera got wet in a sudden shower and began to malfunction. I missed most of the beginning of his spectacular dance, but luckily, was able to manage a few shots towards the end.

Nature till I die

Dew on Branches
What better time than dawn to capture beads of dew? Indeed my first time and to me it seemed that the dewdrops formed in a second, showcased their beauty for another second, then fell to their death. Poetic.

Nature till I die

Jungle babbler, Gir : Gujarat
I was roundly cursed by this feathery friend for disturbing his peace.

Nature till I die

Calotes versicolor, Chennai
This male of the species(identified from its elongated dorsal spine above its head) is common lizard that you spot in your garden. Often mistaken for the chameleon, this lizard possesses the ability to change colour as well. In the breeding season, the male acquires a bright red coloured throat(like in this picture where it is faintly seen in between the black) and thus, is often referred to as a ‘blood sucker’.

Nature till I die

Black faced Langur, Bandipur, Karnataka

Nature till I die

Black faced Langur, Gir, Gujarat

Nature till I die

Calotes rouxii, Agumbe, Karnataka

Nature till I die

Chital, Gir, Gujarat

Nature till I die

Gharial, Crocodile Bank, Chennai

Nature till I die

Signature spider, Bandipur, Karnataka.

Photo credit : Archith K.Sridhar
Contact him at: archithphotography@gmail.com

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Dhanushkodi – at land’s end

Posted by Admin on June 2, 2012

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Dhanushkodi – at land’s end

Barely 20 km from the town of Rameswaram in Tamil Nadu, Dhanushkodi gets its name from Dhanush (bow) and Kodi (end). The name alludes to an anecdote in the Ramayana, where Lord Rama broke the bridge constructed by his army of monkeys between the mainland and the island of Lanka with a stroke of his bow. Barely 50 yards long, Dhanushkodi is the sole terrestrial border between India and Sri Lanka. It was inhabited until 1964, when a terrible cyclone wrecked the village and swept a passenger train into the sea. Though Dhanushkodi today is a ghost town, it is still visited by pilgrims. Yahoo! reader J MADHU RANTHAKAN presents a photographic travelogue of a journey to land’s end.

Dhanushkodi

A distant view of Dhanushkodi town from a vehicle. Pilgrims from all over India visit Rameswaram Temple to bathe in the holy wells and in the sea. It is a well-known pilgrimage site. Only a few, though, know the mythological and historical importance of nearby Dhanushkodi.

Dhanushkodi

A view from Kothandaramaswamy Temple, located 12 km from Rameswaram. Popular belief goes that Vibishana, brother of the demon king Ravana of Lanka, surrendered before Lord Rama here. The mythological importance assigned to this town is that when Lord Rama returned to India after vanquishing Ravana, Vibhishana pleaded with him to break the setu (bridge) so that no other armies would use it. Rama acquiesced to his request and broke the Indian side of the bridge with the end of his bow. This place came to be known as Dhanushkodi (Dhanush is ‘bow’ and kodi is ‘end’ in Tamil) and remains to this day a holy place for Hindus.

Dhanushkodi

Road leading to Dhanushkodi from Rameswaram. It was on this island in January 1897 that Swami Vivekananda, after his triumphant visit to Chicago to attend the Parliament of Religions in September 1893, set foot on Indian soil from Colombo.

Dhanushkodi

Dhanushkodi is today a ghost town and human habitation is almost non-existent as only a few fishermen with their families now live here.

Dhanushkodi

On the fateful night of December 22, 1964, Indian Railways train number 653, the Pamban-Dhanushkodi Passenger, left Pamban with 110 passengers and five railway staff. It was only a few yards before Dhanushkodi railway station when it was hit by a massive tidal wave. The train was washed away, killing all 115 on board. In all, over 1,800 people perished in the cyclonic storm. Following this disaster, the town was declared unfit for living.

Dhanushkodi

All forms of transport to Dhanushkodi stop at Moonram Chathiram. From here, we hire a vehicle – a smelly van that carries fish – more suited to the sandy terrain, to traverse the mud tracks leading up to the ruins. A 7-km bumpy ride along the shore and sometimes into the sea water takes us to the actual ruins.

Dhanushkodi

Dhanushkodi used to have a railway station, a small railway hospital, a higher secondary school, a post office, customs and port offices, temples and a church. Ferries between Dhanushkodi and Talaimannar in Sri Lanka transported travelers and goods across the sea. There were hotels, textile shops and inns (dharmashalas) for pilgrims and travelers.

Dhanushkodi

Remains of the ruined town. Groceries and vegetables were brought by the railways through the Indo-Ceylon Express also called Boat Mail), which connected Madras (now Chennai) to Colombo. Ferries from Talaimannar brought textiles and luxury goods. Before 1964, a train connected Sri Lanka to Madras. It stopped at a pier in Dhanushkodi. From there, passengers used a ferry to cross the 18-km Rama Setu.

Dhanushkodi

Brick walls etched by time and tide tell tearful stories. The structures that withstood the tidal wave exist, buried under the sand and some partly weathered by the sea, adding a mysterious beauty to the place.

Dhanushkodi

The remains of the church and railway station buildings. A few fishermen have settled here in thatched huts.

Dhanushkodi

The walls of the church still stand.

Dhanushkodi

A survivor of the 1964 cyclone who now lives in Dhanushkodi supplies drinking water to tourists from a well on Dhanushkodi beach.

Dhanushkodi

It is amazing that the well, which is just a few yards from the sea, supplies sweet drinking water.

Dhanushkodi

An array of fishing boats seen from the bridge.

Dhanushkodi

A view from the centre of Pamban bridge. I was fortunate to get this shot without any vehicular traffic.

ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPHER:
J MADHU RANTHAKAN is a software professional and a hobbyist photographer interested in sculptures and heritage temple architecture. He also loves photographing nature and children. He is a native of Pollachi in Coimbatore district of Tamil Nadu.

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The Timeless Temples of Thanjavur

Posted by Admin on May 24, 2012

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The Timeless Temples of Thanjavur

Thanjavur, 342 km from Chennai and 56 km from Tiruchirapalli, is very much where Tamil Nadu‘s cultural heart beats. And not for nothing is its monumental shrine to Brihadishwara called a Great Living Chola Temple. Built by Raja Raja Chola I in 1011 to commemorate the victory of the Chola dynasty, this magnificent architectural gem has not fallen into ruins like other temples but remains a centre of worship where religious fervor and architectural grandeur coexist as they did centuries ago. Photo-editor AZHAR MOHAMED ALI returns enchanted from Thanjavur to share these captivating images.

Note from the Admin : – You will not find architectural marvels like these in any other part of this world’s surface. These buildings are extremely complicated in conception, architecture and construction. The beings who helped and inspired the great builders of these timeless monuments were higher dimensional beings from far off other worldly civilizations composing of core central worlds of our Galaxy, always bathed in the Rays of the Great Central Sun of the Milky Way Galaxy and therefore not prone to lower dimensional worlds’ entropic energies of degeneration, devastation and decadence in terms of spiritual and genetic substance.

The blueprints were literally inserted as downloads during dream-state and deep sleep in the architect’s head and the construction personnel would also see vast improvements and fluidity in their skill sets as synchronicity during the building phase of such projects and endeavours thereby making the construction perfect and swift.

At an even earlier and more primal period of the Great Civilizations that dawned and flourished on this world’s surface, the projects would be supervised by beings of pure consciousness manifest in material matter substance bodies manifest temporarily and even by ETs from origins mentioned previously, from their spacecraft in the lower atmosphere at the location of these testaments to Our Divine Origins.

Each of these physical buildings are far from just buildings since they are conceived first at the Astral Level and then drawn down to their physical copies by slowing down matter and changing the type of energy inherent in them. Each has multidimensional and multifaceted purposes, connected not only in exact and unnerving accuracy with constellations and the trajectories from which the Divine Rays of the Great Central Sun coincide with the planet’s surface as per the Grand Cycles of Planetary bodies but also match geographically and energetically key energetic nodals and ley line conjunctions of this Planet’s Grid Framework pattern of Sacred Geometry. They were also used to stabilise the rotation of the planet on its axis and its revolution around the Sun itself.

Holographically since Sacred Geometry is constant and recurring in all beings and bodies the Temples were not just places of worship of Higher Celestial beings but helped draw, funnel, refine and stabilize the Cosmic energies bombarding our world constantly and thereby alleviating the Consciousness quotient of the beings who partook in ceremonial, cultural, traditional, spiritual and at a later era of our evolution on this world, religious activities in such places at auspicious times as per planetary alignments and even altered their genetic makeup to hold and sustain more Light itself from our Sun within their bodies and suit the elevation of the Awareness of their Consciousness itself.

Each monument is unique in all factors of location, dimension, purpose and structural integrity and are vastly superior to pyramids and other plane, drab, ugly ziggurats built by more primitive, warlike and technologically oriented civilizations prompted by similar off world beings at later times of our history. These were used more to channel energies for power consumption through crystals and genetically modify a physical body in an inorganic and utmost artificial process gimmicking and mocking an organic Ascension process. 

Thanjavur

The Brihadishwara Temple, the cynosure of Thanjavur, celebrated a millennium in 2010.

Thanjavur

Thanjavur, among India’s most ancient living cities, dates back to the Sangam period. Of the great dynasties that ruled it, the Cholas who built it outshine the rest. The Great Living Chola Temples, which include the Brihadishwara Temple, are located in the region of Thanjavur. The temple was built by Raja Raja Chola I in the first decade of the 11th century.

Thanjavur

Part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Brihadishwara Temple at Thanjavur is the largest temple in India and is constructed entirely out of granite. The temple’s tower or vimana is 216 feet high. In 2010, Tamil Nadu Tourism marked the millennial celebrations of the Big Temple.

Thanjavur

Temple priests at the Big Temple in Thanjavur. The massive Nandi bull made of smoothened granite stone is sanctified daily.

Thanjavur

A view of the temple precincts.

Thanjavur

Detail of stone reliefs in the temple precincts.

Thanjavur

Sivalingams and idols of secondary deities.

Thanjavur

The pillared hall is richly decorated with frescoes.

Thanjavur

The Brihadishwara Temple, having stood the test of time for a thousand years, is a model for the enduring grandeur of Chola architecture.

Thanjavur

The Tanjore Doll (left), a traditional bobblehead toy that wobbles when moved, is made of baked clay and painted in bright colors.

Thanjavur

Handloom silks are one of the chief economic products of the district of Thanjavur. The town also lends its name to the Tanjore Painting, an artistic style unique to this region. The town is also known as the Rice Bowl of Tamil Nadu for its significant contribution to foodgrain production.

Thanjavur

The Big Temple by night.

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