Revolutionizing Awareness

helping humanity, make choices, more so through awareness, than ignorance

Posts Tagged ‘culture’

Apaulogy: Where art meets cartoon

Posted by Admin on June 1, 2012

http://in.lifestyle.yahoo.com/photos/apaulogy-where-art-meets-cartoon-slideshow/apaulogy-photo-1334593973.html

Apaulogy: Where art meets cartoon

Take a walk by Richards Park in Bangalore, and you’ll stumble upon a most curious gallery that will lure you inside with its funny sketches of a man on a wobbly bicycle and a policeman with ballooning shorts. I followed my feet to find inside a treasure-trove of the city’s collective memories. Apaulogy, the gallery, is a showcase of artist Paul Fernandes’ work as he recaptures the Bangalore of ‘60s and ‘70s – when it was still a sleepy little town. What makes it absolutely delightful is that Paul’s illustrations of the city’s history are in the form of cartoons.

Apaulogy

Artist Paul Fernandes with a cut-out of a policeman from the 1960’s. The official police uniform included shorts starched so stiff they were nicknamed parachutes, and a well-oiled moustache on a Rs. 5 maintenance-allowance.

Apaulogy

Paul Fernandes with Jatin Prabhu and Mona Weber, the gallery’s charming curators who will take you through the time-machine of Paul’s sketches, back to a more comic and peaceful Bangalore.

Apaulogy

Walk through the warm spaces of Apaulogy, step into a picture and travel back in time. If you’re lucky you’ll even bump into the artist on many of his (mis)adventures!

Apaulogy

A music series.

Apaulogy

The hilarious Shine Boards – a collection of misspelt sign-boards across the country that will leave you in splits.

Apaulogy

Praise for Paul’s work.

Apaulogy

Paul’s gallery Apaulogy is located near Richards Park, in Bangalore.

Apaulogy

India Coffee House, MG Road, where the coffee cups were always full and the conversation never ran out.

Apaulogy

Pedestrians at the risk of early learners at the Bangalore Driving School.

Apaulogy

Koshy’s, an old favourite, hasn’t changed much. Unfazed by posh neighbours like the Hard Rock café, it is abuzz with endless energy fuelled cups of tea and homemade sandwiches.

Apaulogy

A boisterous Mangalorean wedding: food, high spirits, and a veritable jewel-box of characters that belong to every Indian family.

Apaulogy

Plaza theatre that once screened the latest films in Bangalore is now the entrance to Namma Metro.

Apaulogy

In simpler times, when crimes were more innocent.

Apaulogy

In Pub City, Bangalore, Dewars Bar was the most popular watering hole. The name of the bar is apparently a play on Devarajan, the owner of the bar and Dewar’s whiskey.

Apaulogy

The BRV went from British armoury to premier movie hall that screened all the James Bond films. However, when they began to lose their audience to competition from other theatres, they began to screen racier films, with women doing cabarets. In ’77 a 20 ft. cut-out of a Japanese woman in a bikini took the city by surprise. But despite the collective shock at such a brazen image, Bangaloreans of the time were too laid-back to organize a hartal or protest.

Apaulogy

Advertisements

Posted in Bengaluru, India Forgotten, Picturesque | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Apaulogy: Where art meets cartoon

The beautiful temples of Bali

Posted by Admin on May 27, 2012

http://in.lifestyle.yahoo.com/photos–the-beautiful-temples-of-bali.html?page=all

The beautiful temples of Bali

The Indonesian island of Bali is home to the majority of the country’s Hindus. Balinese Hinduism is characterized by the worship of the supreme god Acintya, along with the trinity in Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva. The art and ritual of the Balinese Hindus trace back to influences from the 4th century when Hinduism reached the island’s shores. Balinese temples are ornate, beautiful and situated in visually stunning locales. LAKSHMI SHARATH traipses through Bali and returns with these breathtaking picture postcards.

Note from the Admin : – Please include Bali and Thailand as well to the glorious era of the Hindu Empire with strikingly similar architecture across the landmass as well as extremely similar mythological stories and lore of the same group of Gods who were worshiped and revered across the region as well, during the yesteryears of old.

By Lakshmi Sharath | Yahoo Lifestyle Entertainment – Tue 24 Jan, 2012 2:16 PM IST

A roadside temple in Bali

Roadside Temple in Bali, Indonesia © LAKSHMI SHARATH

If you think India has many shrines, think again. In Bali, Indonesia’s Hindu island, there are temples everywhere – in streets, atop mountains, clinging to cliffs, on the seashore, and in the courtyard of every home.

Devotees at the Mother Besakih temple

Balinese Hindus at the Mother Besakih Temple in Bali, Indonesia © LAKSHMI SHARATH

The Mother Besakih temple is one of the most important temples in Bali. It is located atop Mount Agung. It is not just one shrine but a cluster of 20 temples overlooking the villages and the green slopes of the mountain. Balinese believe that the good spirits along with their deities reside here and the shrines resemble houses built for them.

Goa Gajah

Goa Gajah temple in Bali, Indonesia © LAKSHMI SHARATH

Goa, I learned, is pronounced “Guha” as in many Indian languages. It refers to a 1,000-year-old cave excavated here that houses the Hindu trinity of gods and Ganesha, whom the Balinese know as “Gajah” (as in elephant). The 11th century site, called Lwa Gajah, was not discovered until the 1950s and was believed to be a sanctuary of a Buddhist monk. Carved images of the Buddha and smaller shrines and a step-well dot the green landscape here.

Uluwatu

Pura Uluwatu is one of Bali’s most spectacular temples © LAKSHMI SHARATH

Bali’s shrines are often located in the most exotic landscapes. This is Pura Uluwatu right atop the cliff. The scenery is breathtaking as you climb uphill through a small forested area patrolled by boisterous monkeys.

Bali’s royal shrine

Royal shrine in Bali, Indonesia © LAKSHMI SHARATH

Pura Taman Ayun, literally “beautiful garden”, is the shrine of the royalty in Bali. Built in the 17th century, this temple in Mengwi, south Bali, is believed to house the ancestors of the royal dynasty and their family deities.

Puppets galore

Puppets in Bali, Indonesia © LAKSHMI SHARATH

The sounds of performances fill the air as you walk into any of these temples. Wayang or shadow puppetry, the Kecak or fire-dance, and various other local dances like Barong, Legong and Pendet are some of the art forms to experience while you visit these shrines.

Sunset at Tanah Lot

Tanah Lot temple in Bali, Indonesia © LAKSHMI SHARATH

No trip is complete without a glimpse of the spectacular sunset in Tanah Lot temple, a tourist magnet located on a rocky oceanic island. The 15th century shrine, dedicated to the sea spirits, was built under the direction of a priest and is believed to be guarded by snakes.

Lakshmi Sharath is a media professional, traveler, travel-writer, photographer and blogger.

Are you a passionate traveler? Yahoo! India Travel offers you the perfect soapbox to tell your travel tales. Submit your travelogues with photos to travelindiasubmissions@yahoo.in

Posted in Ancient Architecture, Hindu Empire, India Forgotten, Picturesque | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on The beautiful temples of Bali

Magnificent Women of India

Posted by Admin on February 26, 2012

http://in.lifestyle.yahoo.com/photos/magnificent-women-of-india-slideshow/;_ylt=Ai0GWSZgbSopIR0Wi_OkphNgmeh_;_ylu=X3oDMTM3anZmdnFiBG1pdAMEcGtnAzkxMGU2OGJlLTAzNTUtMzMyZS05MjRhLTg1MWU0OThiNTQzNARwb3MDNARzZWMDZW5kX3NzBHZlcgM4NjQzMjJkMi01ZWQ0LTExZTEtYTlmNy1hMWE4Njc4NDMzODc-;_ylv=3

=========================================================================================================================================================

Note from Admin:- To the greatest nation on Earth and Mankind’s greatest compromise to the Divine,…For the Land of My Birth,My Love,My Glory,My Sacrifice and My Passing, Ever Unto Thee…I shall never forget you nor let go, for it is in you that I am forever nested beyond the confines of the Cosmos and Origin…

=========================================================================================================================================================

When France-born photographer CLAUDE RENAULT came to India, he fell in love with the land he now calls “a special place” and his “second country.” His observant eye finds inspiration in commonplace sights that most people let pass without a second glance. His lens seeks out hidden character in the map of human faces, in their laugh lines, dark eyes and unpretentious smiles. A passionate traveler, Renault’s journey is fueled by the mantra: “I won’t travel just for a nice landscape or an historical monument, but for what makes a country: the people.” Enjoy his candid, fascinating and inspiring photos. You will never look at India the same way again. And if you are a foreigner wandering in India with a camera, we invite you to share your impressions of India.

Danuko Lakshmi, a Lambadi woman in Andhra Pradesh.

Photo by Claude Renault

Widows in Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh, renowned in mythology as Krishna‘s playground.

Photo by Claude Renault

Saying hello to God in Sri Sailam, Andhra Pradesh.

Photo by Claude Renault

Durgi is a shepherd I met in Hampi, Karnataka.

Photo by Claude Renault

Papu during the camel fair in Pushkar, Rajasthan, in 2001.

Photo by Claude Renault

Fatima Tabasu, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh in the bus going to Golconda.

Photo by Claude Renault

This Rajasthani pilgrim was sitting inside a small temple next to her husband in Ram Jhula, Rishikesh, Uttarakhand.

Photo by Claude Renault

This woman is the owner of a small ‘Chai’ place in Ram Jhula, Rishikesh, Uttarakhand.

Photo by Claude Renault

A Muslim girl in Gulbarga, Karnataka.

Photo by Claude Renault

A lovely woman I met walking in the streets of Jodhpur, Rajasthan.

Photo by Claude Renault

A Lambadi woman waiting for the bus in Hyderabad.

Photo by Claude Renault

Ma Ganga in Hampi, Karnataka.

Photo by Claude Renault

Danuko, Sri Sailam, Andhra Pradesh.

Photo by Claude Renault

Papu in Pushkar, Rajasthan. I met her for the first time in 2001. Now she owns a little shop near the Ghats.

Photo by Claude Renault

Claude Renault at work

France-born photographer Claude Renault in Varanasi.

View more of his work on his website.

Posted in India Forgotten | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Magnificent Women of India

The Iron Pillar from Delhi

Posted by Admin on February 22, 2010

The Iron Pillar from Delhi

Standing at the center of the Quwwatul Mosque the Iron Pillar is one of Delhi’s most curious structures. Dating back to 4th century A.D., the pillar bears an inscription which states that it was erected as a flagstaff in honour of the Hindu god, Vishnu, and in the memory of the Gupta King Chandragupta II (375-413). How the pillar moved to its present location remains a mystery. The pillar also highlights ancient India’s achievements in metallurgy. The pillar is made of 98 per cent wrought iron and has stood 1,600 years without rusting or decomposing.

The Iron Pillar from Delhi
7.3 m tall, with one meter below the ground; the diameter is 48 centimeters at the foot, tapering to 29 cm at the top, just below the base of the wonderfully crafted capital; it weighs approximately 6.5 tones, and was manufactured by forged welding.


Enigma of the Iron Pillar

B.N. Goswamy

The sight is so familiar: each time you are in the vicinity of the Qutab Minar in Delhi, you find groups of tourists gathered around a tall, sleekly tapering iron pillar in that complex, one person from the group standing with his or her back firmly against it, and trying to make the fingers of the two hands touch while holding the pillar in embrace. Very few succeed but, almost always, there is a feeling of merriment around, since terms are set within the group and each person is ‘tested’, as it were, for fidelity or truthfulness or loyalty, even longevity, it could be anything. When a person fails to make the contact between the fingers of the two hands wrapped around the pillar, squeals of delight go up. This has gone on for years, certainly ever since tourist guides came into being.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in India Forgotten | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on The Iron Pillar from Delhi

Indian Rebellion of 1857

Posted by Admin on February 16, 2010

Indian Rebellion of 1857

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Indian Rebellion of 1857/8
1857 rebellion map.jpg
A 1912 map of ‘Northern India The Mutiny 1857-9’ showing the centres of rebellion including the principal ones: Meerut, Delhi, Cawnpore (Kanpur), Lucknow, Jhansi, and Gwalior.
Date 10 May 1857
Location India (cf. 1857)[1]
Result Rebellion Suppressed,
End of Company rule in India
Control taken by the British Crown
Territorial
changes
Indian Empire created out of former-East India Company territory, some land returned to native rulers, other land confiscated by the Crown.
Belligerents
Mughal Empire
Flag of the British East India Company (1801).svg East India Company Sepoys
7 Indian princely states

Oudh-flag.gif Deposed King of Oudh
Deposed ruler of the independent state of Jhansi
Some Indian civilians and converts to Islam.

United Kingdom British Army
Flag of the British East India Company (1801).svg East India Company‘s Sepoys
Native Irregulars
and EIC British regulars United Kingdom British civilian volunteers raised in Bengal presidency
21 Princely states

Pre 1962 Flag of Nepal.png Kingdom of Nepal
Other smaller states in region

Commanders
Mughal Empire Bahadur Shah II
Nana Sahib
Mughal Empire Mirza Mughal
Flag of the British East India Company (1801).svg Bakht Khan
Rani Lakshmi Bai
Flag of the British East India Company (1801).svg Tantya Tope
Oudh-flag.gif Begum Hazrat Mahal
Commander-in-Chief, India:
United Kingdom George Anson (to May 1857)
United Kingdom Sir Patrick Grant
United Kingdom Sir Colin Campbell (from August 1857)
Pre 1962 Flag of Nepal.png Jang Bahadur[2]

The Indian Rebellion of 1857 began as a mutiny of sepoys of the British East India Company‘s army on 10 May 1857, in the town of Meerut, and soon erupted into other mutinies and civilian rebellions largely in the upper Gangetic plain and central India, with the major hostilities confined to present-day Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, northern Madhya Pradesh, and the Delhi region.[3] The rebellion posed a considerable threat to Company power in that region,[4] and it was contained only with the fall of Gwalior on 20 June 1858.[3] The rebellion is also known as India’s First War of Independence, the Great Rebellion, the Indian Mutiny, the Revolt of 1857, the Uprising of 1857 and the Sepoy Mutiny.

Other regions of Company controlled India—Bengal province, the Bombay Presidency, and the Madras Presidency—remained largely calm.[3] In Punjab, the Sikh princes backed the Company by providing both soldiers and support.[3] The large princely states, Hyderabad, Mysore, Travancore, and Kashmir, as well as the states of Rajputana did not join the rebellion.[5] In some regions, such as Oudh, the rebellion took on the attributes of a patriotic revolt against European presence.[6] Rebel leaders, such as the Rani of Jhansi, became folk heroes in the nationalist movement in India half a century later,[3] however, they themselves “generated no coherent ideology” for a new order.[7] The rebellion led to the dissolution of the East India Company in 1858, and forced the British to reorganize the army, the financial system, and the administration in India.[8] India was thereafter directly governed by the Crown in the new British Raj.[5]

Contents

[hide]

//

[edit] East India Company expansion in India

India in 1765 and 1805 showing East India Company Territories

India in 1837 and 1857 showing East India Company and other territories

Although the British East India Company had earlier administered the factory areas established for trading purposes, its victory in the Battle of Plassey in 1757 marked the beginning of its rule in India. The victory was consolidated in 1764 at the Battle of Buxar (in Bihar), when the defeated Mughal emperor, Shah Alam II, granted control of Bengal, Bihar, and Orissa to the Company. The Company soon expanded its territories around its bases in Bombay and Madras: the Anglo-Mysore Wars (1766–1799) and the Anglo-Maratha Wars (1772–1818) led to control of most of India south of the Narmada River.

After the turn of the 19th century, Governor-General Wellesley began what became two decades of accelerated expansion of Company territories.[9] This was achieved either by subsidiary alliances between the Company and local rulers or by direct military annexation. The subsidiary alliances created the Princely States (or Native States) of the Hindu maharajas and the Muslim nawabs. Punjab, North-West Frontier Province, and Kashmir were annexed after the Anglo-Sikh Wars in 1849; however, Kashmir was immediately sold under the Treaty of Amritsar (1850) to the Dogra Dynasty of Jammu and thereby became a princely state. In 1854, Berar was annexed, and the state of Oudh was added two years later.

[edit] Causes of the rebellion

Posted in India Forgotten | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Indian Rebellion of 1857