Revolutionizing Awareness

helping humanity, make choices, more so through awareness, than ignorance

Posts Tagged ‘imperialism’

100-yr-old photos of British India found in shoebox

Posted by Admin on May 12, 2012

http://in.news.yahoo.com/photos/exquisite-hundred-year-old-photos-of-british-raj-discovered-in-a-shoe-box-slideshow/exquisite-hundred-year-old-photos-of-british-raj-discovered-in-a-shoe-box-photo-1336556192.html

Note from the Admin : – My beloved Mother Land, Land of my birth, livelihood and demise, I will ever return unto Thee, only to fathom thy Limitless Beauty, Glory, Culture, Heritage, your various Traditions abounding playfully amidst the shores of Tranquility and the steep Cliffs of your Timeless Spirituality. Yonder I wander, thither I am lost, weeping in the sorrow of having to bear witness your Ungodly Fall into pittance and ineptitude.

Release your bonds and unshackle Yourself, shake off the dew of rust, complacence and decadence that have covered you for too long, wake up and surmise all the chaos and debauchery that surround your existence wrought with injustice, butchery and barbarism.

May the tears of my pain well your springs of Intolerance so You may rise again to be the Shining Light of this World, that You have always and forever will be, beyond the confines of Mankind’s mistakes and fall from Grace, its Ultimate compromise to the Divine.

The most interesting discoveries are indeed made in the most unlikely of places: a treasure-trove of photographs, documenting life in India over 100 years ago during the British Raj, has recently been found in a shoebox in Edinburgh.A total of 178 negatives were found in a shoebox for a pair of grey, size 9, Peter Lord slip-on shoes by the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland (RCAHMS). The stunning negatives were stored in 5” by 8” plate boxes and had been wrapped in copies of The Statesman newspaper of 1914.Nothing is yet known about the photographer of these historic images, although efforts are on to find out his or her identity.Among the images are some that depict the celebrations for the visit of King George V and Queen Mary to Calcutta in 1912 with the city’s buildings all lit up. Others show pilgrims gathered for a religious festival; merchants selling their wares outside the Jagannath temple in Orissa; labourers pulling carts loaded with crates at (probably) the Howrah station, while another shows a woman standing outside a house, most likely, in Darjeeling.Take a look at these amazing photographs from a bygone era and marvel at what life was like for the common Indian during the British rule.

Exquisite hundred-year old photos of British Raj discovered in a shoe box

Exquisite hundred-year old photos of British Raj discovered in a shoe box

Exquisite hundred-year old photos of British Raj discovered in a shoe box

Exquisite hundred-year old photos of British Raj discovered in a shoe box

The Sages, Ascetics, Rishis, Sanyasins, Gurus, Seekers and Spiritualists who have kept the walls of my country strong and timeless.

Exquisite hundred-year old photos of British Raj discovered in a shoe box

Exquisite hundred-year old photos of British Raj discovered in a shoe box

Exquisite hundred-year old photos of British Raj discovered in a shoe box

Exquisite hundred-year old photos of British Raj discovered in a shoe box

Exquisite hundred-year old photos of British Raj discovered in a shoe box

Exquisite hundred-year old photos of British Raj discovered in a shoe box

A group of filthy and disgusting white boys with their white albino gals trying to look serious but silly enough to make monkeys cry out of despair.

Exquisite hundred-year old photos of British Raj discovered in a shoe box

Exquisite hundred-year old photos of British Raj discovered in a shoe box

Exquisite hundred-year old photos of British Raj discovered in a shoe box

Exquisite hundred-year old photos of British Raj discovered in a shoe box

Another faggot who thinks it can play one of its own civilised sports!

Exquisite hundred-year old photos of British Raj discovered in a shoe box

Exquisite hundred-year old photos of British Raj discovered in a shoe box

Exquisite hundred-year old photos of British Raj discovered in a shoe box

Exquisite hundred-year old photos of British Raj discovered in a shoe box

Must be the previous faggot’s brother – yet another faggot trying to look big and superior in front of the camera.

Exquisite hundred-year old photos of British Raj discovered in a shoe box

Must be the two faggots’ father, an older faggot.

Exquisite hundred-year old photos of British Raj discovered in a shoe box

The faggots’ sister who looks like it spent many days under the sands in Tanzania with ostriches, ducking out of pure scariness with stilt legs.

Exquisite hundred-year old photos of British Raj discovered in a shoe box

The Holy dips of our culture polluted by steam boats to carry albinos on their chartered courses of conquest and upheavals.

Exquisite hundred-year old photos of British Raj discovered in a shoe box

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Indian Rebellion of 1857

Posted by Admin on February 16, 2010

Indian Rebellion of 1857

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Indian Rebellion of 1857/8
1857 rebellion map.jpg
A 1912 map of ‘Northern India The Mutiny 1857-9’ showing the centres of rebellion including the principal ones: Meerut, Delhi, Cawnpore (Kanpur), Lucknow, Jhansi, and Gwalior.
Date 10 May 1857
Location India (cf. 1857)[1]
Result Rebellion Suppressed,
End of Company rule in India
Control taken by the British Crown
Territorial
changes
Indian Empire created out of former-East India Company territory, some land returned to native rulers, other land confiscated by the Crown.
Belligerents
Mughal Empire
Flag of the British East India Company (1801).svg East India Company Sepoys
7 Indian princely states

Oudh-flag.gif Deposed King of Oudh
Deposed ruler of the independent state of Jhansi
Some Indian civilians and converts to Islam.

United Kingdom British Army
Flag of the British East India Company (1801).svg East India Company‘s Sepoys
Native Irregulars
and EIC British regulars United Kingdom British civilian volunteers raised in Bengal presidency
21 Princely states

Pre 1962 Flag of Nepal.png Kingdom of Nepal
Other smaller states in region

Commanders
Mughal Empire Bahadur Shah II
Nana Sahib
Mughal Empire Mirza Mughal
Flag of the British East India Company (1801).svg Bakht Khan
Rani Lakshmi Bai
Flag of the British East India Company (1801).svg Tantya Tope
Oudh-flag.gif Begum Hazrat Mahal
Commander-in-Chief, India:
United Kingdom George Anson (to May 1857)
United Kingdom Sir Patrick Grant
United Kingdom Sir Colin Campbell (from August 1857)
Pre 1962 Flag of Nepal.png Jang Bahadur[2]

The Indian Rebellion of 1857 began as a mutiny of sepoys of the British East India Company‘s army on 10 May 1857, in the town of Meerut, and soon erupted into other mutinies and civilian rebellions largely in the upper Gangetic plain and central India, with the major hostilities confined to present-day Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, northern Madhya Pradesh, and the Delhi region.[3] The rebellion posed a considerable threat to Company power in that region,[4] and it was contained only with the fall of Gwalior on 20 June 1858.[3] The rebellion is also known as India’s First War of Independence, the Great Rebellion, the Indian Mutiny, the Revolt of 1857, the Uprising of 1857 and the Sepoy Mutiny.

Other regions of Company controlled India—Bengal province, the Bombay Presidency, and the Madras Presidency—remained largely calm.[3] In Punjab, the Sikh princes backed the Company by providing both soldiers and support.[3] The large princely states, Hyderabad, Mysore, Travancore, and Kashmir, as well as the states of Rajputana did not join the rebellion.[5] In some regions, such as Oudh, the rebellion took on the attributes of a patriotic revolt against European presence.[6] Rebel leaders, such as the Rani of Jhansi, became folk heroes in the nationalist movement in India half a century later,[3] however, they themselves “generated no coherent ideology” for a new order.[7] The rebellion led to the dissolution of the East India Company in 1858, and forced the British to reorganize the army, the financial system, and the administration in India.[8] India was thereafter directly governed by the Crown in the new British Raj.[5]

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[edit] East India Company expansion in India

India in 1765 and 1805 showing East India Company Territories

India in 1837 and 1857 showing East India Company and other territories

Although the British East India Company had earlier administered the factory areas established for trading purposes, its victory in the Battle of Plassey in 1757 marked the beginning of its rule in India. The victory was consolidated in 1764 at the Battle of Buxar (in Bihar), when the defeated Mughal emperor, Shah Alam II, granted control of Bengal, Bihar, and Orissa to the Company. The Company soon expanded its territories around its bases in Bombay and Madras: the Anglo-Mysore Wars (1766–1799) and the Anglo-Maratha Wars (1772–1818) led to control of most of India south of the Narmada River.

After the turn of the 19th century, Governor-General Wellesley began what became two decades of accelerated expansion of Company territories.[9] This was achieved either by subsidiary alliances between the Company and local rulers or by direct military annexation. The subsidiary alliances created the Princely States (or Native States) of the Hindu maharajas and the Muslim nawabs. Punjab, North-West Frontier Province, and Kashmir were annexed after the Anglo-Sikh Wars in 1849; however, Kashmir was immediately sold under the Treaty of Amritsar (1850) to the Dogra Dynasty of Jammu and thereby became a princely state. In 1854, Berar was annexed, and the state of Oudh was added two years later.

[edit] Causes of the rebellion

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