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Posts Tagged ‘Nuclear reactor technology’

Keshe launching energy generation and space exploration plasma technology

Posted by Admin on March 27, 2011

http://pesn.com/2009/07/23/9501555_Keshe_space_exploration_energy/

An interview with the inventor of what could be the next generation of commercial space travel and clean energy generation, said to be ready for licensing. We’re talking super fast and cheap travel, and super cheap energy. 3 kW units are available for viewing or testing by qualified licensing parties.

by Sterling D. Allan
Pure Energy Systems News
Copyright © 2009

While the world commemorates the Apollo astronauts‘ landing on the moon 40 years ago, I was privileged Monday, on the moon landing anniversary, to interview nuclear engineer, Mehran T. Keshe of the Keshe Foundation, who on that momentous day had sent out notice to government leaders around the world that he has a plasma technology in Belgium with anti-gravity (not his terminology) and energy-generating ramifications that could lead the way to commercially viable journeys into space and to the moon, along with generating affordable, renewable energy both for transportation and electricity.

He plans to publicly demonstrate the technology to thousands of people in major cities around the world next year; and he plans to start booking flights for space travel – e.g. up 60 km above the earth – by 2014, and for flights to the moon by 2016, transporting thousands of people to those destinations for a small fraction of the cost of what fuel-based shuttle services are projecting.  He’ll even be accepting down payments with guarantees for both flight opportunities.  You’ll be able to put 20% of $50,000 Euros down to reserve your seat on a trip to the moon.  “It may even end up costing less than that.”  Wait a while longer (past 2016) and you could even get to Mars in a matter of a few days, rather than months.  http://KesheSpace.com is being set up for booking flights.  If you’re worried about plunking down the 20% deposit, Keshe says that the deposits are guaranteed with bank backing to be refunded upon request or in case the flights do not materialize.

In the interview, Keshe briefly explained the science behind the technology.  “It’s not anti-gravity,” he corrected me.  Rather, what happens is that his plasma reactor creates a local imitation of the Earth’s magnetic-gravitational properties, complete with magnetosphere, providing protection from the cosmic rays that can otherwise be deadly outside of the Earth’s atmosphere.  Because the phenomenon is local to the reactor, a gravitational force of 1-G is maintained for all craft occupants, including during acceleration and deceleration.

Existing craft, such as a 747, minus the wings (they get in the way), could serve as the transport shell, once fitted with the plasma reactor; though spherical craft would be better.  Weight is no issue.  Number of passengers is no issue.  And no specialized training would be required for the pilots of such craft.

And the transport capabilities are not just for space.  Imagine going from New York to Paris in a matter of minutes, rather than half a day.  Imagine having one of these to beat the traffic to work.  Imagine living in some remote location in the Alps, powered by the same technology, and commuting to Australia — or to the moon, to help build a colony there.  The trucking industry would no longer involve highways, but would be point-to-point specific, rapid, and involve no fuel costs.

Speaking of fuel, one of my primary interests in this technology is its claims for cheap, clean energy generation.  Keshe claims that his reactors can produce on the level of kilowatts of electricity, with no fuel, drawing energy from the environment where it is replenished from an inexhaustible source using principles of plasma.  And he says that these reactors (in the range of 3 kW output, continuous) are available presently for interested parties (e.g. for potential licensing) to inspect or to test for themselves.

He told me that the technology is far enough advanced, and simple enough that a licensing party could be in production in a matter of several weeks, not including the 2-3 month training period for learning the technology.  Given the regulatory hoops alone, I find that a bit hard to believe, but I’m intrigued by the principle of simplicity.  He said that the quantity of units presently deployed numbers in the hundreds.  Those entering into negotiations for licenses do so under NDA, and will be required to provide proof of financial capability of payment for setting up factories and paying for licensing.

While the demonstration units will be expensive (e.g. $50k Euros to purchase for testing), once mass produced, Keshe thinks the price for these kilowatt generators could be in the few hundreds of dollars — like ten times cheaper than the cheapest energy sources available today of any variety; and they would last for decades.  For example, a 3-5 kilowatt unit might cost $200 Euros and last 20-30 years.

Eventually, each community or even each home could be fitted with one, and each vehicle.  The technology wouldn’t really scale down smaller than that, so you’ll still need cords, batteries or some kind of inductive coupling for your portable devices and appliances.

I have asked Keshe if I can contact some of the people who have tested his technology, and he is in process of receiving permissions to do so, as the contract as it is written grants confidentiality.

First page clipping image
Keshe has filed at least two international patents.

I asked Keshe about the gravity modification capabilities of his technology in terms of what he’s actually accomplished, beyond just theoretical speculation.  He said that he has elevated a 100+ kg mass — himself.  Apparently, in his book, he describes how he damaged a system by jumping on it last year while it was flying.  He sent me a link to a confidential video showing a 9 kg mass changing to 8 kg, and a 7 kg mass changing to 6 kg.  He claims to have been able to figure out not only the elevation control, but also the direction of motion control.

Keshe told me that his device is a “simple nuclear reactor,” but that it doesn’t involve controlled nuclear isotopes, but that it involves materials that could be found in a home, having minute levels of radioactivity.  Part of the process apparently involves extracting hydrogen from the atmosphere, so I presume that space travel would require storage tanks of some kind.  Keshe said that even the “human body is a miniature nuclear reactor”, involving nitrogen.

These principles of energy generation and gravity modification are articulated in the book Keshe recently published: The Universal Order of Creation of Matters,  He has also posted five youtube movies explaining the key concepts described in the book.

You will also notice on the KesheFoundation YouTube channel that there are a number Coke bottle demonstration videos.  Keshe said that hundreds of people have replicated the plasma creation and graphene-coating capabilities demonstrated in this simple proof of concept experiment.  This demonstration apparently mimics on a micro level what happens on the macro level in a solar system or in a galaxy — the microcosm mimicking the macrocosm.

Keshe said that there are thousands of scientists from around the world who have been working on various elements of this technology for years, helping to bring the technology to the point that it is at now.  He specifically mentioned U.C.L.A., and said that some governments have also been involved in replicating and refining the design.  He told me in an email that the technology was reviewed by team of professors in Belgium in 2005 for seven months, and by another Belgian university considering the nano technology, which was also reviewed by nano institutes.  The technology has also been reviewed by a government nuclear research center in Europ, by top universities in Iran, China, Korea, “and I think DARPA has [a] full report where we have been and [a] copy of all reports.”

As exciting as the above claims are about gravity modification and energy generation, Keshe is even more enthusiastic about the health ramifications of the technology.  He said that the carbon coating on the nervous system can be improved, helping conditions such as M.S. or chronic fatigue, just by drinking treated water.

I didn’t quite catch why, but apparently some Belgian news outlet has a vendetta against Keshe because he would not sell out his technology some years ago, nor subject himself to the system of bribes involved in the European energy industry; and they vowed a media blackout of his technology, which apparently they have been successful thus far in enforcing.  As of today, our coverage at Examiner.com is the only thing that pulls up in a Google news search for recent news stories on Keshe.

On the less malevolent level, Keshe said that NASA asked him to remove some claims from his site about rapid transport between destinations on earth, due to the disruptive ramifications of that statement.  There are a lot of existing industries that would be rendered obsolete but such technology — if it is real, if they don’t adopt it — including NASA.  Keshe told me he is some 30-60 years ahead of NASA (not including the affiliated black ops who have been using UFO-like craft around for decades).

At the end of our interview, I asked Keshe about the irony of his being Iranian, with Iran being a point of potential war erupting soon.  In defense of his native country, he said that Iran is “a peaceful nation,” and the Iranian government has been very supportive of his technology.  The irony is found in that Keshe, may have the very technology that would not only render war obsolete by introducing abundance where there has been scarcity, but also by removing borders because of how easy it will be to travel between any two points.

It’s likely that many of these assertions about the Keshe technology capability and price are on the way optimistic end of the spectrum, per the inventor pride that is common.  However, there seems to be enough compelling aspects to this account that make it worth investigating further.

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Links Mentioned

Keshe Interview Audio

Feedback

  • Feel free to view or add your own comments to the publication of this article at Examiner.com

Replicating the Coke bottle experiment

On July 24, 2009, Arthur Manelas wrote:

Here’s how I replicate the Keshe Plasma Reactor. Parts that I used:
1. Four pieces of #14 copper wire 8″ long.
2. One plastic clear bottle with a screw cap.
3. 1/2 cup of Seven-Up.
4. 1 tsp. of koh-2 (potassium hydrate)
5. 1 tube of clear silicone.
6. 1 volt meter.
7. 3 resistors, 1 25k , 1 50k and1 100k.

Making the plasma reactor:
Remove the bottle cap from the bottle; drill 4 holes 3/32nd of an inch 90 degrees apart.. Insert the 4 electrodes in each hole. Silicone the holes so that it will make an air tight connection. Make sure the electrodes do not touch one another. Insulate if needed. Take the 1/2 cup of seven-up and mix it with koh-2 and allow 10 minutes for the catalyst to perform. Insert the electrode assembly in the bottle and screw cap tight. Turn bottle on its side and make sure the electrodes do not immerse in the solution. Take the volt meter, set it to measure millivolts. Find out the highest output by touching the different electrodes. It should read around 100 – 175 millivolts. Apply 100 k resistor to the load. Meter should read 120  millivolts; with a 50 k it should be 80 millivolts, and with a 25 k it will read 40 millivolts.

Conclusion:
The creation of electrical energy in this reactor is achieved by simple process of hydrogen ionization.

* * * *

See also

PESWiki.com pages:

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Blast at Japan nuke plant; thousands missing

Posted by Admin on March 12, 2011

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110312/ap_on_bi_ge/as_japan_earthquake

By ERIC TALMADGE and YURI KAGEYAMA, Associated Press Eric Talmadge And Yuri Kageyama, Associated Press 3 mins ago

IWAKI, Japan – An explosion shattered a building housing a nuclear reactor Saturday, amid fears of a meltdown, while across wide swaths of northeastern Japan officials searched for thousands of people missing more than a day after a devastating earthquake and tsunami.

The confirmed death toll from Friday’s twin disasters was 686, but the government’s chief spokesman said it could exceed 1,000. Devastation stretched hundreds of miles (kilometers) along the coast, where thousands of hungry survivors huddled in darkened emergency centers cut off from rescuers, electricity and aid.

The scale of destruction was not yet known, but there were grim signs that the death toll could soar. One report said four whole trains had disappeared Friday and still not been located. Others said 9,500 people in one coastal town were unaccounted for and that at least 200 bodies had washed ashore elsewhere.

Atsushi Ito, an official in Miyagi prefecture, among the worst hit states, could not confirm those figures, noting that with so little access to the area, thousands of people in scores of town could not be contacted or accounted for.

“Our estimates based on reported cases alone suggest that more than 1,000 people have lost their lives in the disaster,” Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said. “Unfortunately, the actual damage could far exceed that number considering the difficulty assessing the full extent of damage.”

Among the most worrying developments was concerns that a nuclear reacter could melt down. Edano said Saturdya’s explosion was caused by vented hydrogen gas and destroyed the exterior walls of the building where the reactor is, but not the actual metal housing enveloping the reactor.

Edano said the radiation around the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant had not risen after the blast, but had in fact decreased.

Three people being evacuated from an area near the plant have been exposed to radiation, Yoshinori Baba, a Fukushima prefectural disaster official, confirmed. But he said they showed no signs of illness.

Virtually any increase in ambient radiation can raise long-term cancer rates, and authorities were planning to distribute iodine, which helps protect against thyroid cancer.

Authorities have also evacuated people from a 12-mile (20-kilometer) radius around the reactor.

The explosion was caused by hydrogen interacting with oxygen outside the reactor. The hydrogen was formed when the superheated fuel rods came in contact with water being poured over it to prevent a meltdown.

“They are working furiously to find a solution to cool the core, and this afternoon in Europe we heard that they have begun to inject sea water into the core,” said Mark Hibbs, a senior associate at the Nuclear Policy Program for the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. “That is an indication of how serious the problem is and how the Japanese had to resort to unusual and improvised solutions to cool the reactor core.”

Officials have said that radiation levels were elevated before the blast: At one point, the plant was releasing each hour the amount of radiation a person normally absorbs from the environment each year.

The explosion was preceded by puff of white smoke that gathered intensity until it became a huge cloud enveloping the entire facility, located in Fukushima, 20 miles (30 kilometers) from Iwaki. After the explosion, the walls of the building crumbled, leaving only a skeletal metal frame.

Tokyo Power Electric Co., the utility that runs the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant, said four workers suffered fractures and bruises and were being treated at a hospital.

The trouble began at the plant’s Unit 1 after the massive 8.9-magnitude earthquake and the tsunami it spawned knocked out power there, depriving it of its cooling system.

Power was knocked out by the quake in large areas of Japan, which has requested increased energy supplies from Russia, Russia’s RIA Novosti agency reported.

The concerns about a radiation leak at the nuclear power plant overshadowed the massive tragedy laid out along a 1,300-mile (2,100-kilometer) stretch of the coastline where scores of villages, towns and cities were battered by the tsunami, packing 23-feet (7-meter) high waves.

It swept inland about six miles (10 kilometers) in some areas, swallowing boats, homes, cars, trees and everything else.

“The tsunami was unbelievably fast,” said Koichi Takairin, a 34-year-old truck driver who was inside his sturdy four-ton rig when the wave hit the port town of Sendai.

“Smaller cars were being swept around me,” he said. “All I could do was sit in my truck.”

His rig ruined, he joined the steady flow of survivors who walked along the road away from the sea and back into the city on Saturday.

Smashed cars and small airplanes were jumbled up against buildings near the local airport, several miles (kilometers) from the shore. Felled trees and wooden debris lay everywhere as rescue workers coasted on boats through murky waters around flooded structures, nosing their way through a sea of debris.

Late Saturday night, firefighters had yet to contain a large blaze at the Cosmo Oil refinery in the city of Ichihara.

According to official figures, 642 people are missing and missing 1,426 injured.

Prime Minister Naoto Kan said 50,000 troops joined rescue and recovery efforts, aided by boats and helicopters. Dozens of countries also offered help.

President Barack Obama pledged U.S. assistance following what he called a potentially “catastrophic” disaster. He said one U.S. aircraft carrier was already in Japan and a second was on its way.

More than 215,000 people were living in 1,350 temporary shelters in five prefectures, the national police agency said.

Aid has barely begun to trickle into many areas.

“All we have to eat are biscuits and rice balls,” said Noboru Uehara, 24, a delivery truck driver who was wrapped in a blanket against the cold at center in Iwake. “I’m worried that we will run out of food.”

Since the quake, more than 1 million households have not had water, mostly concentrated in northeast. Some 4 million buildings were without power.

About 24 percent of electricity in Japan is produced by 55 nuclear power units in 17 plants and some were in trouble after the quake.

Japan declared states of emergency at two power plants after their units lost cooling ability.

Although the government spokesman played down fears of radiation leak, the Japanese nuclear agency spokesman Shinji Kinjo acknowledged there were still fears of a meltdown.

A “meltdown” is not a technical term. Rather, it is an informal way of referring to a very serious collapse of a power plant’s systems and its ability to manage temperatures.

Yaroslov Shtrombakh, a Russian nuclear expert, said a Chernobyl-style meltdown was unlikely.

“It’s not a fast reaction like at Chernobyl,” he said. “I think that everything will be contained within the grounds, and there will be no big catastrophe.”

In 1986, the Chernobyl nuclear reactor exploded and caught fire, sending a cloud of radiation over much of Europe. That reactor — unlike the Fukushima one — was not housed in a sealed container, so there was no way to contain the radiation once the reactor exploded.

The reactor in trouble has already leaked some radiation: Before the explosion, operators had detected eight times the normal radiation levels outside the facility and 1,000 times normal inside Unit 1’s control room.

An evacuation area around the plant was expanded to a radius of 12 miles (20 kilometers) from the six miles (10 kilometers) before. People in the expanded area were advised to leave quickly; 51,000 residents were previously evacuated.

“Everyone wants to get out of the town. But the roads are terrible,” said Reiko Takagi, a middle-aged woman, standing outside a taxi company. “It is too dangerous to go anywhere. But we are afraid that winds may change and bring radiation toward us.”

The transport ministry said all highways from Tokyo leading to quake-hit areas were closed, except for emergency vehicles. Mobile communications were spotty and calls to the devastated areas were going unanswered.

Local TV stations broadcast footage of people lining up for water and food such as rice balls. In Fukushima, city officials were handing out bottled drinks, snacks and blankets. But there were large areas that were surrounded by water and were unreachable.

One hospital in Miyagi prefecture was seen surrounded by water. The staff had painted an SOS on its rooftop and were waving white flags.

Technologically advanced Japan is well prepared for quakes and its buildings can withstand strong jolts, even a temblor like Friday’s, which was the strongest the country has experienced since official records started in the late 1800s. What was beyond human control was the killer tsunami that followed.

Japan’s worst previous quake was a magnitude 8.3 temblor in Kanto that killed 143,000 people in 1923, according to the USGS. A magnitude 7.2 quake in Kobe killed 6,400 people in 1995.

Japan lies on the “Ring of Fire” — an arc of earthquake and volcanic zones stretching around the Pacific where about 90 percent of the world’s quakes occur, including the one that triggered the Dec. 26, 2004, Indian Ocean tsunami that killed an estimated 230,000 people in 12 countries. A magnitude-8.8 quake that shook central Chile in February 2010 also generated a tsunami and killed 524 people.

___

Kageyama reported from Tokyo. Associated Press writers Malcolm J. Foster, Mari Yamaguchi, Tomoko A. Hosaka and Shino Yuasa in Tokyo, Jay Alabaster in Sendai, Sylvia Hui in London, David Nowak in Moscow, and Margie Mason in Hanoi also contributed.

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