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Smiling face of sailor pictured just 48 HOURS before he ‘gunned down two of his officers, killing one’ on nuclear sub HMS Astute

Posted by Admin on April 10, 2011

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1374850/HMS-Astute-shooting-Ryan-Donovan-pictured-smiling-48-hours-incident.html

By Stephen Wright, Ian Drury and Chris Greenwood
Last updated at 7:35 PM on 9th April 2011

 

  • Mayor and Southampton City Council chief exec on board during tragedy
  • Royal Navy serviceman arrested for shooting of two colleagues
  • Defence Secretary Liam Fox ‘greatly saddened’ by ‘tragic incident’
  • Victim’s wife: ‘Ian was utterly devoted to his family. Everything he did was for us’

Police are today questioning Ryan Donovan who is believed to have shot two senior officers, killing one of them, on a nuclear submarine before his deadly gun rampage was stopped by a council leader.

Pictured less than 48 hours before the alleged incident in the control room of a nuclear submarine, he can be seen smiling with his ward mates, unaware of the violence that would follow two days later.

Gillian Molyneux, Lt Cdr Molyneux’s wife, said: ‘Ian was utterly devoted to his family. Everything he did was for us. He was very proud to be an officer in the Royal Navy Submarine Service. He will live on in our four beautiful children.’

Scroll down for video report

Smiling: This picture was taken on board HMS Astute showing Ryan Donovan, circled, smiling with his fellow crewmates. Less than two days later he launched a gun attack that killed one senior officer and left another injured

Smiling: This picture was taken on board HMS Astute showing Ryan Donovan, circled, smiling with his fellow crewmates. Less than two days later he launched a gun attack that killed one senior officer and left another injured

Lieutenant Commander Ian Molyneux with his wife, Gillian. She described him as being 'very proud to be an officer in the Royal Navy Submarine Service'

Lieutenant Commander Ian Molyneux with his wife, Gillian. She described him as being ‘very proud to be an officer in the Royal Navy Submarine Service’

Lieutenant Chris Hodge, circled, having dinner with some of his colleagues

Lieutenant Chris Hodge, circled, having dinner with some of his colleagues

Captain Phil Buckley, Captain of the Faslane Flotilla to which HMS ASTUTE belongs, said: ‘Ian Molyneux was a thoroughly professional and competent submarine engineer and a great asset to HMS ASTUTE and the Royal Navy’s Submarine Service.

‘His untimely death is a big blow to his family, who have the Flotilla’s deepest sympathy. His loss will also be felt by his shipmates and across the Service. He was, simply, a good bloke.’

Admiral Sir Mark Stanhope, First Sea Lord said: ‘This is a very sad day for the Royal Navy and in particular the Submarine service. Our submarines are crewed by a highly professional cadre of sailors, many of whom are actively involved today in operations in the North Atlantic, Mediterranean and Indian Ocean.

Arrested: Ryan Donovan was today being interviewed by police over the alleged shooting

Arrested: Ryan Donovan was today being interviewed by police over the alleged shooting

‘This incident is indeed tragic and the Royal Navy, in cooperation with the Hampshire Constabulary will investigate this incident fully.

My personal thoughts and sympathies and those of the whole Royal Navy are with the family of Lt Cdr Molyneaux, and that of the injured submariner.’

The gunman was overpowered by a visiting council leader, Royston Smith, who last night described the extraordinary scenes on HMS Astute, a £1.2 billion attack submarine.

‘A guy appeared in his gear,’ he said. ‘He had all his body armour and camo on and was carrying a weapon, not a handgun, an SA80.

‘The first two shots I heard, I didn’t see. Three and four were reasonably close. Fortunately most people were out of the way.

‘He was stood in the doorway. I was about five yards away. I didn’t think about it but took a decision that if I didn’t stop him I might get hit or other people might get hit.

‘I just charged at him, and pushed him against the wall. I got hold of his weapon and had a tussle.’

Mr Smith, 46, who served in the RAF as a mechanic, said the gunman made no noise during the struggle.

‘I was shouting a bit. That wasn’t successful so I threw him, charged him against the other wall,’ he added. ‘I managed to pull the rifle away from him.

‘In the first tussle he let off shot number five. I felt something but it didn’t hurt. There were about five or six shots in total.

‘I took the gun and threw it to my left under a table out of his reach.’

Schoolchildren – aged 14 to 16 and on a visit to the vessel in Southampton Docks – ran for cover when the shooting broke out.

HMS Astute is berthed in Southampton docks. The submarine arrived on Wednesday, following 46 days at sea for the 98-strong crew, for a five-day visit

Crime scene: HMS Astute arrived at Southampton docks on Wednesday

Hero: Councillor Royston Smith with Commander Breckenridge alongside HMS Astute

Hero: Councillor Royston Smith with Commander Breckenridge alongside HMS Astute

The dead man is Lieutenant Commander Ian Molyneux, the submarine’s weapons engineering officer and a father of two who was in his thirties. He was due to transfer to the Navy’s second Astute class sub, HMS Ambush, and was second in rank to the submarine’s commander.

The wounded man was named last night as Lt Cdr Chris Hodge,

The man accused of firing the shots is believed to be able seaman Ryan Donovan, 22. He was under arrest last night and is said to have snapped after being refused shore leave.

Donovan, wearing body armour and camouflage clothing, is alleged to have taken his Navy issue SA80 and fired six shots.

Colleagues said the 5ft 6ins sailor had been pressed into carrying out his previous tour of duty, despite being due shore leave, The Sun reported.

He was believed to be dreading spending another month at sea on more exercises due to start on Monday.

 

 

Police and Navy officers guard the docks around the HMS Astute in Southampton where the shooting took place

Police and Navy officers guard the docks around the HMS Astute in Southampton where the shooting took place

Reports also claimed the rating snapped after he was told he could not use a toilet because visiting dignitaries should go first, The Times reported.

A Ministry of Defence source told the newspaper: ‘With civic dignitaries on board, toilet arrangements were stretched to the absolute limit.

‘I’m told the rating said he urgently needed to attend a call of nature only to be ordered to allow visitors first use of a toilet near the control room.’

Mr Smith, a Tory who became leader of the city council last year, added: ‘People were in shock. Most people didn’t do anything but we only had seconds. I wasn’t going to take it lying down.

‘I don’t feel like a hero. I rather wish it had never happened. The naval officers had been shot so they weren’t in a position to do anything. They weren’t in a good state. I’m just lucky that I got to come home tonight because some of those guys won’t.’

Mr Smith was on board with city mayor Carol Cunio and council chief executive Alistair Neill. They all escaped injury.The Ministry of Defence confirmed the shooting was not related to terrorism. A security review will now examine the case for tighter controls on those allowed to carry weapons on nuclear-powered submarines.

The gunman’s psychiatric state will also be examined. Police plan to speak to 30 witnesses to the midday incident. Last night Alec Samuels, a Tory councillor, told the Daily Mail: ‘I’ve heard that Royston Smith helped to overpower the gunman.

‘I’m not surprised because he is an extremely energetic and courageous fellow. That is exactly how I would expect him to respond.

‘He has been keeping fit by climbing mountains to raise money for injured British soldiers coming back from overseas conflicts.

‘This would have stood him in good stead. In fact, I would have been very surprised if he had done nothing on that submarine.’

Armed police, firemen, paramedics and the Hampshire and Isle of Wight Air Ambulance helicopter were sent to the dockside where the submarine had been berthed since Wednesday.

The vessel had been due to stay in the port for five days, on a public relations mission. Brian Cedar, who lives at the city’s marina, said: ‘I saw at least six people carry a stretcher off the gangway into a waiting ambulance.

‘If you can have a shooting like this on a nuclear submarine it is worrying.’

A 50-year-old dock worker said: ‘The whole place just filled with police and we thought it might be a nuclear incident.’

Senior Royal Navy officer, Captain Phil Buckley, who is in charge of nuclear submarines based at Faslane in Scotland, said last night: ‘The submarine is in an entirely normal and safe state. There is no nuclear incident taking place.’

 

A police boat, two vans, a police car and fire truck are seen rushing to the scene near HMS Astute after the shooting

A police boat, two vans, a police car and fire truck are seen rushing to the scene near HMS Astute after the shooting

 

An emergency services helicopter lands at the scene of the shooting near the submarine on Southampton docks, where one person has been confirmed dead

An emergency services helicopter lands at the scene of the shooting near the submarine on Southampton docks, where one person has been confirmed dead

 

FACTFILE: THE £1.2BN HMS ASTUTE

The HMS Astute has faced embarrassing setbacks since being revealed as one of the UK’s newest and most powerful attack submarines.

The 97-m long vessel – the flagship of the Navy’s submarine fleet and ‘the stealthiest ever built in the UK’ – can carry up to 38 Spearfish heavy torpedoes and Tomahawk Land Attack Cruise missiles.

But the sub, which at 7,800 tonnes weighs the equivalent of 1,000 double decker buses, has been beset by problems since it was commissioned in August 2010.

Two months later it ran aground on a shingle bank in the Isle of Skye and had to be towed free after 10 hours.

Last December the £1.2 billion Astute suffered a mechanical failure during sea trials off the Scottish coast and was forced to limp back to its home port of Faslane.

The sub is the first of seven new nuclear-powered submarines of its class, with its nuclear reactors meaning it will not need refuelling in its entire 25-year life.

The vessel is faster underwater than it is on the surface and is capable of speeds of 20 knots – though its official top speed remains classified.

Hampshire Police spokesman Alan Smith said: ‘There were a number of naval personnel plus visitors on board at the time of the shooting.

‘What happened forms part of the investigation which is at a very early stage and everyone who was on board is a potential witness.

‘There were around 11 children aged 14 to 16 on the quayside when the incident occurred and they were aware of what happened but left soon after. They are being offered support if needed.’

HMS Astute had been scheduled to host visits from Sea Scouts and school and college pupils from Southampton and the New Forest.

Defence Secretary Dr Liam Fox said: ‘I am greatly saddened to hear of this incident and of the death of a Royal Navy service person in this tragic incident.

‘It is right and proper that a full police investigation is carried out and allowed to take its course.

‘My thoughts and sympathies are with those who have been affected and their families.’

Astute hit the headlines when it ran aground on a shingle bank between the Scottish mainland and the Isle of Skye and remained marooned for several hours.

The embarrassing incident in October last year cost Commander Andy Coles his command of the submarine.

He was replaced by Commander Iain Breckenridge.

The silent giant

 

Crew members in the control room aboard the Royal Navy's newest and most advanced submarine, HMS Astute, in Southampton today where she has arrived for a five day visit to the city.

Crew members pictured in the control room aboard HMS Astute on the day she arrived in Southampton

A crew member climbs into a bunk

A crew member climbs into a bunk. The submarine arrived in Southampton on Wednesday, following 46 days at sea for the 98-strong crew

The galley aboard the Royal Navy's newest and most advanced submarine
Crew members pass in a narrow corridor aboard HMS Astute

The galley on the submarine and (right) a submariner edges along a narrow corridor on board the boat

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WELTPOLITIK’ AND ITS CONSEQUENCES

Posted by Admin on January 30, 2011

“Describe the development of Germany‘s Weltpolitik after 1890 and its effect on the Anglo-American relations. Discuss the implications for the general development of the great powers system in pre-1914 Europe

Table of contents:

Part I: Introduction;

Part II: Aims and development of Weltpolitik;

Part III: Implications of this policy on Anglo-US Relations;

Part IV: Conclusion:

Implications for the general development of the great powers system in pre-1914 Europe:

______________________________________________________________________

Part I:

Introduction: Weltpolitik was the name given to Germany’s foreign policy in the years following its unification at the hands of Otto Von Bismarck. (Carroll, 1938, p. 351) In terms of genealogy, it simply stood for ‘world policy’, and was the word given to denote Germany’s policy abroad. Historians, however, attach to this word a significance that goes beyond just its terminology. It is used to refer to aggressive German diplomacy between 1890 and 1914, and was closely related to colonial and economic interests. The need for imperialism was felt both to bolster Germany’s new identity, and to supplement its industrial expansion. (Smith, 1978, pp. 174, 175) Like its cousin, imperialism, Weltpolitik, too was based on the ‘Social Darwinism’ model of racial superiority; its essence was postulated on the belief that expansion of its territories in other parts of the globe was the true indicator of the nation’s fitness. (Hale, 1940, p. 155)

Weltpolitik signalled a stark departure from the policy that Bismarck had applied in unifying Germany less than two decades earlier. (Dawson, 1915, p. 131) If Bismarck had used the concept of Realpolitik, a notion by which its relationship with other countries guided not by sentiment but by practical and result-yielding politics based on interests (Anderson, 1969, p. 302) to unify Germany, the feeling that now ran in the German political establishment was that the newly unified power could harness its energies to gain a position of pre-eminence in world affairs. (Knoll & Gann, 1987, pp. 61-63) The leitmotif of the unified Reich was the development of a strong navy and imperialism. These two, obviously, brought the country into direct confrontation with the leading naval and imperial power of the time, Britain. Germany was heavily obsessed in particular with naval power as an instrument for exhibiting its might. Its naval ambitions were inspired by American Admiral Alfred Thayer Mahan’s path-breaking work, The Influence of Sea Power Upon History, which was catching the imagination of Europe’s leading nations. (Hale, 1940, p. 155)

Part II:
Aims and development of Weltpolitik: The Kaiser’s newfound zeal towards territorial and naval expansion coincided with Britain’s loss of face following its costly and humiliating win in the Boer War, after which it was keen to reassert itself as a great power on the world stage. With his mischievous Kruger Telegram, he virtually solemnised British hostility, when he sent a telegram congratulating Paul Kruger, the Premier of Transvaal in South Africa for his supposed win over the British. (Ludwig, 1927, p. 189)

Ironically, the Kaiser was a professed Anglophile, since the two countries’ ruling families were closely related by marriage. But this mutual admiration was erratic and patchy, and was not strong enough to override his ambitions. (Wilkinson, 2002) The starting point of the concretisation of hostility with Britain was in the year 1897, when the whimsical Kaiser started a programme of upgrading the nation’s navy to heights that would match that of the British. This was when the policies of the Second Reich took a decisive turn towards militarism. The men he appointed to draw up and direct these policies were the Deputy Chief of the General Staff, Count Alfred Waldersee and the better known naval commander, Admiral Von Tirpitz. (Stapleton, 2003) Tirpitz, in particular, convinced the Kaiser of the need to abandon Bismarck’s policy of appeasement of the British navy and instead challenge the world’s most powerful navy head on, (Stapleton, 2003) with his famous dictum, “[w]ithout sea-power, Germany’s position in the world resembled a mollusk without a shell.” (Hale, 1940, p. 156) The Kaiser’s receptivity to these suggestions gave shape to the idea of Weltpolitik, whose aim was also to supplant Britain’s sea power, at least in Europe. (Stapleton, 2003) The Kaiser, once he got converted to this idea, persuaded the German public with highly dramatised and grandiloquent statements. (Dawson, 1915, pp. 134, 135)

However, challenging the British was problematic, since Britain was Germany’s largest trading partner, and her capital was indispensable for the latter’s burgeoning industry. Germany sought to offset these contradictions by building a strong navy and by growing imperially; it was the truculent way in which it sought to carry this out that made Britain turn hostile towards it. (Smith, 1978, p. 177) But it was a little too late in the day that Germany had embarked upon this old idea. Very few areas of the world were left to be colonised; all that it could set its eyes on were some parts of Central Africa and the Pacific Islands. (Smith, 1978, p. 113)

Part III:
Implications of this policy on Anglo-US Relations:  While Germany’s rising imperial ambitions were cause for some alarm for Britain, its naval expansion started happening at a time when another distant nation was taking giant strides towards becoming the world’s leading naval power –America. The US, by the late 19th century was trying to come out of its self-imposed isolationism and was beginning to flex its muscle on the international stage. This period was the beginning of American ascendancy on the world; it, too, like Germany, sought to develop a strong navy as the chief mechanism to achieve its aim. As America was growing in the western hemisphere to challenge Britain’s naval superiority, an episode showed the taste of things to come – the crisis with Britain over the small issue of the border dispute between Venezuela and British Guinea. The Americans intervened and settled the issue with utmost ease, and mocked Britain for not having the ability to solve its problem by itself. This incident hurt Britain. However, it had to swallow its pride and not risk going to war with the US on this issue, mainly because of the emergence of Germany under the Kaiser’s Weltpolitik. Because of this German policy, countering its rise was a more urgent priority, and left Britain with little time to concentrate on another continent against a much stronger opponent, in a confrontation whose result it would have been unsure of. In a sense, this was a tacit British admission of the emergence of American naval might. Thus, indirectly, Weltpolitik made Britain restrain itself against America, and acknowledge its potential rise as the leading naval and industrial nation of the world, (Dobson, 1995, pp. 8-20) a position that continues to this day.

Part IV:

Conclusion:

Implications for the general development of the great powers system in pre-1914 Europe: The Kaiser’s fascination with ships was imbibed from a young age; in fact, he had even designed a battleship himself, which performed all functions other than floating! (Wilkinson, 2002) Unfortunately, the damage his obsession caused to Europe and its colonies was not so humorous. To neutralise this new power, Britain entered into alliances with France, with whom it had a history of animosity, and with Russia and Belgium. (Fay, 1958, p. 16) Fearing the prowess of this alliance, Germany, under the Schlieffen Plan, set up Austria-Hungary against Russia, with Italy becoming the other part of the alliance, known as the Triple Alliance. This developed into an all out pattern of alliances, by which action by one country would draw all others. (Bond, 1998, pp. 92-95) Eventually, all it took was the shooting of Archduke Ferdinand of Austria on June 28, 1914 to draw the continent into a spiral of chain reactions culminating in the outbreak of World War I. (Scheff, 1994, p. 83) All of these were a result of the system of alliances, of which the Kaiser’s Weltpolitik was one of the root causes.

 

Written By Ravindra G Rao

References

 

 

Anderson, P. R. (1969), The Background of Anti-English Feeling in Germany, 1890-1902, Octagon Books, New York.

Bond, B., (1998), The Pursuit of Victory: From Napoleon to Saddam Hussein, Oxford University Press, Oxford.

Carroll, E. M., (1938), Germany and the Great Powers, 1866-1914: A Study in Public Opinion and Foreign Policy, Prentice-Hall, New York.

Dawson, W. H., (1915), What Is Wrong with Germany? Longman, New York.

Dobson, A. P., (1995), Anglo-American Relations in the Twentieth Century: Of Friendship, Conflict, and the Rise and Decline of Superpowers, Routledge, New York.

Fay, S. B., (1958), “Origins of the World War” In The Outbreak of the First World War: Who Was Responsible?, Lee, D. E. (Ed.) (pp. 16-21), D. C. Heath, Boston.

Hale, O. J., (1940), Publicity and Diplomacy: With Special Reference to England and Germany, 1890-1914, D. Appleton-Century, New York.

Knoll, A. J. & Gann, L. H., (Eds.), (1987), Germans in the Tropics: Essays in German Colonial History, Greenwood Press, New York.

Ludwig, E., (1927), Wilhelm Hohenzollern, the Last of the Kaisers, Mayne, E. C., Trans., New York; G. P. Putnan’s sons, London.

Scheff, T. J., (1994), Bloody Revenge: Emotions, Nationalism, and War, Westview Press, Boulder, CO.

Smith, W. D., (1978), The German Colonial Empire, University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, NC.

Stapleton, F., (2003), “An Army with a State, Not a State with an Army”: F.G. Stapleton Examines the Role Played by the Armed Forces in the Government of the Second Reich. History Review, Vol. 46, p. 38+. Retrieved April 26, 2006, from Questia database.

 

Wilkinson, R., (2002), “Germany, Britain & the Coming of War in 1914”: Richard Wilkinson Explains What Went Wrong in Anglo-German Relations before the First World War, History Review, p. 21+. Retrieved April 26, 2006, from Questia database.

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