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Posts Tagged ‘San Francisco’

World’s longest suspension bridges

Posted by Admin on June 4, 2012

http://in.finance.yahoo.com/photos/world-s-longest-suspension-bridges-slideshow/yangluo-bridge-photo-1337682916.html

Yangluo_Bridge

Yangluo Bridge

With a main span of 1,280 metres (4,200 ft), it is tied with the Golden Gate Bridge for the ninth longest suspension bridge in the world.

By Bighandking [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons.

Golden gate

Golden Gate Bridge

The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate, the opening of the San Francisco Bay into the Pacific Ocean. It has been declared one of the modern Wonders of the World by the American Society of Civil Engineers. The Frommers travel guide considers the Golden Gate Bridge “possibly the most beautiful, certainly the most photographed, bridge in the world”.

By Aslak Raanes from Trondheim, Norway (Flickr) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)%5D via Wikimedia Commons

Verrazano-Narrows_Bridge

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge

The bridge furnishes a critical link in the local and regional highway system. Since 1976, it has been the starting point of the New York City Marathon.[4] The bridge marks the gateway to New York Harbor; all cruise ships and most container ships arriving at the Port of New York and New Jersey must pass underneath the bridge and thus must be built to accommodate the clearance under the bridge.

By Ibagli (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons .

Tsing_Ma_Bridge

Tsing_Ma_Bridge

The bridge was named after two of the islands at its ends, namely Tsing Yi and Ma Wan . It has two decks and carries both road and rail traffic, which also makes it the largest suspension bridge of this type.

By [2] ([1]) [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons.

Jiangyin_Yangtze

Jiangyin Suspension Bridge

It connects the cities of Jiangyin and Jingjiang. The main span of the bridge is 1,385 metres (4,544 ft) meters long, making it the sixth-longest span suspension bridge in the world.

By Yawn823 at en.wikipedia. Later version(s) were uploaded by Masterdudeyo at en.wikipedia. (Transferred from en.wikipedia) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

Humber_Bridge

Humber Bridge

The Humber Bridge, near Kingston upon Hull, England, is a 2,220 m (7,283 ft) single-span suspension bridge, which opened to traffic on 24 June 1981. It is the fifth-largest of its type in the world.

By Lee Jackson (Own work (Photograph taken by myself)) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Runyang_Bridge

Runyang Bridge

The Runyang Bridge is a large bridge complex that crosses the Yangtze River in Jiangsu Province, China, downstream of Nanjing. The complex consists of two major bridges that link Zhenjiang on the south bank of the river and Yangzhou on the north. The bridge is part of the Beijing-Shanghai Expressway.

By Andy Zang (originally posted to Panoramio) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons.

GreatBeltBridge

Great belt bridge

The Great Belt Fixed Link (Danish: Storebæltsforbindelsen) is the fixed link between the Danish islands of Zealand and Funen across the Great Belt. It consists of a road suspension bridge and railway tunnel between Zealand and the island Sprogo, as well as a box girder bridge between Sprogo and Funen

By Tone V. V. Rosbach Jensen [CC-BY-SA-2.5 (www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], via Wikimedia Commons.

Xihoumen_Bridge

Xihoumen Bridge

The 5.3-kilometre-long suspension bridge connection has a 2.6-kilometre-long main bridge with a central span of 1,650 metres.

By Siyuwj (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons.

Akashi-Kaikyo_Bridge

Akashi Bridge

Also known as the Pearl Bridge, it has the longest central span of any suspension bridge,[2] at 1,991 metres (6,532 ft). It is located in Japan and was completed in 1998.

Before the Akashi Kaikyō Bridge was built, ferries carried passengers across the Akashi Strait in Japan. This dangerous waterway often experiences severe storms and, in 1955, two ferries sank in the strait during a storm, killing 168 people. The ensuing shock and public outrage convinced the Japanese government to develop plans for a suspension bridge to cross the strait.

Photo by Fotograf: Marcus Tschaut

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Facebook hit with unsolicited porn, violent videos

Posted by Admin on November 17, 2011

http://in.news.yahoo.com/facebook-hit-unsolicited-porn-violent-videos-193601769.html

By Alistair Barr | Reuters – Wed, Nov 16, 2011

REUTERS – Facebook Inc said on Tuesday that it is investigating a rash of unsolicited graphic images that hit some users’ accounts this week.

The images, Internet links and videos depicting pornography and violence have hit some people’s Facebook newsfeeds in recent days.

“We experienced a coordinated spam attack that exploited a browser vulnerability,” Facebook spokesman Andrew Noyes said in a statement emailed to Reuters. “Our efforts have drastically limited the damage caused by this attack, and we are now in the process of investigating to identify those responsible.”

Facebook does not know yet who was behind the attack and a motive was not clear, Noyes added during an interview with Reuters.

Facebook users were tricked into pasting and executing “malicious” javascript in their browser URL bar, which led to them unknowingly sharing the content, Noyes explained.

Facebook engineers have been working to reduce this browser vulnerability, he added.

Facebook and other “Web 2.0” sites are easy targets for such attacks because they pull in a lot of content from outside sources, according to Paul Ferguson, senior threat researcher at Trend Micro Inc.

“It seems every other day there is some new Facebook ‘threat,’ but this is just the new reality of Web 2.0 and social networking,” Ferguson said. “It is ‘low-hanging fruit’ for criminals.”

(Reporting by Alistair Barr in San Francisco and Jim Finkle in Boston, editing by Gerald E. McCormick and Matthew Lewis)

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One man’s crusade to stop toxic sludge dumping in Indonesia

Posted by Admin on April 12, 2011

http://news.yahoo.com/s/csm/20110411/wl_csm/376094;_ylt=Ato0wIq.eWDvtaAdbAu8xilvaA8F;_ylu=X3oDMTJkZG5hdHMwBGFzc2V0A2NzbS8yMDExMDQxMS8zNzYwOTQEcG9zAzI3BHNlYwN5bl9hcnRpY2xlX3N1bW1hcnlfbGlzdARzbGsDb25lbWFuMzlzY3J1

By Simon Montlake Simon Montlake Mon Apr 11, 2:57 pm ET

Gresik, Indonesia – Fish net in hand, Prigi Arisandi kicks off his sandals and wades into a shallow stream. Behind him a gaggle of uniformed high school students bend to their task: identifying the plants and bugs scooped from the waterway. Water samples are decanted into ice-cube trays and the contents are matched with textbook drawings.

For Mr. Prigi, an environmental activist, these weekly classes are another way to tackle river pollution, which has afflicted vital waterways in Java, Indonesia’s most densely populated island. He wants to instill in his students the need to protect the biodiversity of the 13-mile Surabaya River where he once played as a child, before factories moved in and the waters ran black.

The stream is clear and healthy. The nearby fields are planted with sugar cane. But Prigi worries that factories and houses will soon replace the fields and pose a threat to the rivers. So he’s teaching the kids to understand and cherish their environment.

“More factories and houses will come here. I want [the children] to be prepared,” he says.

Prigi’s efforts to check the dumping of toxic waste have become a personal crusade. “He never stops thinking about the river,” says Daru Setyorini, his wife and fellow activist, whom he met while studying biology at university.

In recognition of these efforts, Prigi is a recipient of the 2011 Goldman Environmental Prize, announced Monday, April 11, in San Francisco. The award is worth $150,000 and is given to six worldwide recipients in various categories.

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Together with Ms. Daru, with whom he has three children, Prigi runs Ecoton, an nongovernmental organization with a staff of nine people and an annual budget of around $57,000. The award represents a boost for its campaign against river pollution, which has led it to sue the provincial government in 2007 for failing to enforce water-quality regulations. In a landmark ruling, the court ordered the government to set maximum limits for toxic discharges by factories into the Surabaya River.

The government now monitors the discharges using river boat patrols. And the water quality has improved, according to official data. But Prigi says the government should do more.

Prigi plans to use part of his prize money to build a research and ecotourism site near the river’s pristine source, where it is known as the Brantas River. He worries that unchecked upstream development could pollute the Brantas and other waterways. His plan is to work with local villages to develop eco-friendly alternatives that generate income.

“We are rich in biodiversity, but we don’t know it,” he says.

Firsthand impact of rapid industrialization

Growing up in Gresik, outside the port city of Surabaya, Prigi saw firsthand the impact of rapid industrialization. As a student he led protests against factories that dumped untreated waste into the river. His passion for environmental causes and field research left little time for study, but with Daru’s help he graduated and plunged into full-time activism.

He began running river tours for young people and encouraging schools to add environmental programs. Some looked askance at the bespectacled activist with his wildlife posters. “They thought I was a salesman. I said, no, I want to give this to you,” he laughs.

At the same time, Prigi tried to goad local authorities into tackling water pollution. After the fall of dictator Suharto in 1998, Indonesia’s media found its voice and Prigi became adept at courting publicity for his causes. But effluents from factories and houses continued to flow into the Surabaya River, which provides drinking water for the city’s 3 million residents.

“It was black, like coffee,” says Daru.

In October 2007, it got worse. Prigi got reports of dead fish floating in the river and set off to find the cause. His investigation led him to a state-owned sugar factory that had tried to cover up a leak in its treatment plant. After Prigi went to the local media with his findings, the factory admitted its error and agreed to upgrade its plant, a legacy of Dutch colonial rule.

Koesriharto, a factory official, says the new equipment has cut the amount of effluent discharged into the river. “We want to improve our waste-water treatment with new technology,” he says.

Indonesia passed a new environmental law in 2009 that stiffens penalties for polluters, including criminal charges for company owners. But Prigi knows that some factory bosses will shrug off the risk of prosecution. That’s why he keeps putting pressure on provincial authorities to monitor water quality and keep tabs on industrial zones.

Ongoing efforts

Factories aren’t the only culprits. On a recent overcast morning, Prigi paddles his rubber boat past a swath of houses that back onto the river. Garbage floats past: plastic bags, bottles, tree branches, flip-flops, and lighters. Pipes protrude from brick outhouses, flushing waste directly into the river. Yet women still bend to wash clothes in the murky water.

After years of castigating factories for their toxic discharge, Prigi has begun to focus on the problem posed by household waste. Thousands of houses line the riverbank and there is little awareness of the health risks. “People don’t care about the river. They don’t know that the river [supplies] our drinking water,” he says.

As he scans the riverbanks, Daru scoops up water samples to test on her hand-held equipment. She shows the results to Prigi, who suspects that an upstream sluice gate has been opened, sending a cascade of waste into the river. He pulls out his mobile phone and calls the river regulatory agency, ready to do battle again.

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