Revolutionizing Awareness

helping humanity, make choices, more so through awareness, than ignorance

Posts Tagged ‘Sunday’

Set Yourself Free

Posted by Admin on September 28, 2012

by Owen K Waters

Back in the Middle Ages in Europe, the popular path towards spirituality was to become a monk or a nun. Monasteries and convents were well funded as their local populations were compelled by law to, not only attend church on Sundays, but also to donate 10 percent of their incomes to the church.

Monks and nuns took vows which relieved them of the distractions of having to make a living. They took vows of poverty, chastity and obedience. Freed from the distractions of laboring for pay or supporting a family, they were able to pass many hours per day in worship and contemplation. The obedience part of the vow was thrown in for good measure because it suited those in charge.

The problem is that, once a vow is taken, it becomes stored in your subconscious mind which, unlike your physical brain, lives on after death and reincarnates with your spirit into each new life.

If you are struggling today with money issues, close relationships, or you feel a lack of the initiative that could solve your problems, you probably took a vow of poverty, chastity and obedience in a past life. Such vows seemed like a good idea at the time but, because reincarnation was banned from the teachings of the Bible, no one realized what trouble this would cause in future lives.

Such vows were taken with no expiration date. There was no “until death do us part” type of clause included, so these individuals’ subconscious minds faithfully recorded the vows as obligations which would continue until further notice. Today, you might be struggling to pay bills and wanting to create prosperity in your life to end the struggle. But if you have a subconscious blockage that says, “Must not have money” or “Money is bad,” then the blockage will prevail and you’ll continue to struggle.

From a neutral, detached point of view, it is obvious that money, which is just another form of energy, can’t actually be “bad” any more than electricity is bad. Functionally, money is no more than the currency of personal energy. It represents the work you’ve done and your ability to pay for the work of others to supply your needs. If you have a mental block about money, then perhaps it’s time to stop suffering and kick out the block!

While the poverty part of the vow will produce financial hardship, the chastity part will make relationships unfulfilling. The obedience part leads to a belief that people who have gained positions of authority know best. This self-denying stance is no longer appropriate in today’s world, as these are the days when the Spiritual Age is emerging. Today, we live in a self-empowered age which calls for individual mastery of life, not the blind following of anyone who claims to know best. They rarely do.

There is one expert in this world who knows what’s really best for you and you see that person every time you look in the mirror! Look into the reflection of your eyes – the windows of the soul – and ask for the eternal wisdom that lies within you to come forth. You already know the answer to every personal challenge. Just give your conscious mind permission to hear that inner wisdom.

Sooner or later, all obsolete vows need to be released in order to set yourself free from the invisible chains of self-imposed limitation. Any vows taken in past lives with no expiration date are typically inappropriate in the way they affect later lives. The circumstances that made a past life vow appropriate at the time no longer exist because every life is a different adventure in a different setting.

In order to develop your own potential, you need to be free of obsolete, past-life obligations. Only you can develop your potential. No one else can do it for you. This life is your adventure and it is your time to either grow to realize your true potential or to be hobbled continually by blockages that slow everything down.

If you suspect that your subconscious mind may be harboring inappropriate vows, you can release them quite simply by conscious effort. Here’s how to set yourself free with your own personal Declaration of Independence:

Enter a quiet state and make this necessary and long-overdue statement:

“I now renounce and release all vows that I have taken which have outlived their purposes and which now limit my potential for growth. I reclaim my personal freedom and declare such vows renounced and released as of now. I replace old vows with the knowing that I am loved and that I am Love.”

For best effect, repeat it two or more times, adding feeling and meaning each time. Continue to revisit the statement until you feel truly liberated and able to move forward to grow and naturally prosper in these, the dawning days of The Spiritual Age.

Set your friends free! Forward this email and let them know how to release hidden limitations.

This material was excerpted from Owen Waters’ book, “Love, Light, Laughter: The New Spirituality,” which is available in paperback and as a downloadable e-book.

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Floods kill 77 in Assam, two million affected

Posted by Admin on July 4, 2012

http://in.news.yahoo.com/photos/floods-in-assam-slideshow/

At least 77 people have been killed and nearly two million affected by heavy monsoon rains that caused floods in Assam, in what the prime minister on Monday called one of the worst such disasters to strike recently.Prime Minister announced an aid package of Rs.500 crore. The mighty Brahmaputra river and many of its tributaries have breached their banks after downpours, washing away thousands of homes mostly made of bamboo and straw, as well as roads, bridges and power lines.Authorities have given shelter, food and medicines to thousands of homeless people, and deployed mobile medical teams to prevent the outbreak of disease.(Reuters)

Floods kill 77 in Assam, two million affected

This handout photograph received from the Press Information Bureau (PIB) and taken on July 1, 2012 shows an Indian Air Force (IAF) helicopter on a Relief and Rescue mission in the flood-affected areas of Assam. At least 79 people have died and 2.2 million forced to leave their homes over the last week as torrential monsoon rains triggered floods across India‘s northeast, officials said on July 2, 2012.

A view of flood-affected people, who are stranded, standing on a bridge in the flooded area of the Sonitpur district in Assam

A view of flood-affected people, who are stranded, standing on a bridge in the flooded area of the Sonitpur district in the northeastern Indian state of Assam July 1, 2012. Incessant heavy rains in northeast India have caused massive flooding and landslides, killing more than 60 people, local media reported on Sunday. Picture taken July 1, 2012. REUTERS/Stringer (INDIA – Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT)

An aerial view shows the flood-affected areas of the Sonitpur district in Assam

An aerial view shows the flood-affected areas of the Sonitpur district in the northeastern Indian state of Assam July 1, 2012. Incessant heavy rains in northeast India have caused massive flooding and landslides, killing more than 60 people, local media reported on Sunday. Picture taken July 1, 2012. REUTERS/Stringer (INDIA – Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT)

Floods kill 77 in Assam, two million affected

Villagers travel on a country boat through flood waters at the flood affected area of Tataliguri in Morigoan district, some 80 kms from Guwahati, the capital city of India’s northeastern state of Assam on June 29, 2012. At least 27 people have died and 10,00,000 others have been forced to leave their homes as monsoon rains swamp wide areas of the northeastern Indian state of Assam, officials said. AFP PHOTO/Biju BORO

Flood-affected residents are silhouetted against the setting sun as they travel on a boat through their submerged paddy fields at Himalua village

Flood-affected residents are silhouetted against the setting sun as they travel on a boat through their submerged paddy fields at Himalua village in the northeastern Indian state of Assam July 1, 2012. Incessant heavy rains in northeast India have caused massive flooding and landslides, killing more than 60 people, local media reported on Sunday. REUTERS/Utpal Baruah

A view of flood-affected people with their domesticated animals stranded on an islet in a flooded area of the Sonitpur district in Assam

A view of flood-affected people with their domesticated animals stranded on an islet in a flooded area of the Sonitpur district in the northeastern Indian state of Assam July 1, 2012. Incessant heavy rains in northeast India have caused massive flooding and landslides, killing more than 60 people, local media reported on Sunday. Picture taken July 1, 2012. REUTERS/Stringer (INDIA – Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)

A flood-affected man pushes a temporary raft carrying his son through the flood waters after heavy rains at Mayang village

A flood-affected man pushes a temporary raft carrying his son through the flood waters after heavy rains at Mayang village in the northeastern Indian state of Assam June 30, 2012. Incessant heavy rains in northeast India have caused massive flooding and landslides, killing at least a dozen of people, local media reported. REUTERS/Utpal Baruah

A flood-affected girl uses a submerged hand-pump at Dhuhibala village

A flood-affected girl uses a submerged hand-pump to fetch drinking water at Dhuhibala village in the northeastern Indian state of Assam July 1, 2012. Incessant heavy rains in northeast India have caused massive flooding and landslides, killing more than 60 people, local media reported on Sunday. REUTERS/Utpal Baruah

Flood-affected residents use a temporary raft to move their belongings to safer places in front of their submerged hut at Himalua village

Flood-affected residents use a temporary raft to move their belongings to safer places in front of their submerged hut at Himalua village in the northeastern Indian state of Assam July 1, 2012. Incessant heavy rains in northeast India have caused massive flooding and landslides, killing more than 60 people, local media reported on Sunday. REUTERS/Utpal Baruah

Flood-affected residents sit inside their flooded house at Dhuhibala village

Flood-affected residents sit inside their flooded house at Dhuhibala village in the northeastern Indian state of Assam July 1, 2012. Incessant heavy rains in northeast India have caused massive flooding and landslides, killing more than 60 people, local media reported on Sunday. REUTERS/Utpal Baruah

Flood-affected residents move to safer places on a temporary raft next to their submerged huts after heavy rains at Khalabhyan village

Flood-affected residents move to safer places on a temporary raft next to their submerged huts after heavy rains at Khalabhyan village in the northeastern Indian state of Assam June 30, 2012. Incessant heavy rains in northeast India have caused massive flooding and landslides, killing at least a dozen of people, local media reported. REUTERS/Utpal Baruah

Unidentified women weep next to the body of a victim of a boat that sank in India's Brahmaputra river, at Buraburi village

Unidentified women weep next to the body of a victim of a boat that sank in India’s Brahmaputra river, at Buraburi village in Dhubri district of the northeastern Indian state of Assam May 1, 2012. Rescue workers fought heavy wind and rain to search for survivors after at least 103 people drowned on an overloaded ferry carrying about 300 people that sank at night on one of India’s largest rivers on Monday, police said. REUTERS/Utpal Baruah

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Calm prevails as Occupy deadlines pass in 2 cities

Posted by Admin on November 28, 2011

http://news.yahoo.com/calm-prevails-occupy-deadlines-pass-2-cities-122035346.html

By ANDREW DALTON and GEOFF MULVIHILL | AP – 9 mins ago

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Deadlines for Wall Street protesters to leave their encampments came and went in two cities with no arrests in Philadelphia and a festive, party-like atmosphere as protesters in Los Angeles defied the order clear out early Monday.

Protesters defied the mayor’s deadline to vacate their encampment near City Hall in Los Angeles, with about 1,000 flooding into the area as hundreds of tents remained standing as they have for nearly two months.

A celebratory atmosphere filled the night with protesters milling about the park and streets by City Hall in seeming good spirits. A group on bicycles circled the block, one of them in a cow suit. Organizers led chants with a bull horn.

“The best way to keep a non-violent movement non-violent is to throw a party, and keep it festive and atmospheric,” said Brian Masterson.

Police presence was slight right after the 12:01 a.m. PST Monday deadline, but it began increasing as the morning wore on. At the same time, the number of protesters dwindled.

“People have been pretty cooperative tonight. We want to keep it peaceful,” police Cmdr. Andrew Smith told The Associated Press.

He refused to discuss how or when police will move to clear the park, but he said: “We’re going to do this as gently as we possibly can. Our goal is not to have anybody arrested. Our goal is not to have to use force.”

A deadline set by the city for Occupy Philadelphia to leave the site where it has camped for nearly two months passed Sunday without any arrests.

The reactions to the expired deadlines in Los Angeles and Philadelphia were far different from those in other cities in recent weeks, where pepper spray, tear gas and police action have been used in the removal of long-situated demonstrators since the movement against economic disparity and perceived corporate greed began with Occupy Wall Street in Manhattan two months ago.

Dozens of tents remained at the encampment outside Philadelphia’s City Hall Monday morning, twelve hours after a city-imposed deadline passed for the protesters to move to make way for a construction project.

No arrests were immediately reported Monday. The camp appeared mostly quiet amid a heavy police presence, but around 5 a.m. EST a handful of people were marching one of the city’s main business corridors banging drums.

The scene outside City Hall was quiet most of the day Sunday. But the sound of protesters’ drumming did bring complaints from several people living in nearby high-rise apartment buildings.

In Los Angeles, by 2:30 a.m., most protesters had moved from the camp site in the park to the streets. That put them technically in compliance with the mayor’s eviction order, but could lead to confrontation with police if they try to clear the streets.

There have so far been no arrests or reports of violence.

“We’re still here, it’s after 12, ain’t nobody throwing anything at the cops, they haven’t come in and broken anyone’s noses yet, so it’s a beautiful thing,” said Adam Rice, a protester standing across the street from police in riot gear.

In Philadelphia, along the steps leading into a plaza, about 50 people sat in lines Sunday with the promise that they would not leave unless they were carried out by authorities. For a time, they linked arms. But as it seemed that a forceful ouster was not imminent, they relaxed a bit. A police presence was heavier than usual but no orders to leave had been issued.

A few dozen tents remained scattered on the plaza, along with trash, piles of dirty blankets and numerous signs reading, “You can’t evict an idea.”

Several hundred supporters surrounded those who were prepared to face arrest for one of the Occupy movement meetings known as a general assembly.

The meeting started out with logistics — making sure those sitting in had quarters to make calls from jail and that someone was gathering important medical information — but it soon turned to big ideas.

The protesters described their many hopes for a better world. Among them: reparations for slavery and Native American lands, better and more inspiring schools, recognizing gay marriage, and end to homelessness, fewer TVs and better pay for artists. Some of those who spoke with hope and joined in rendition of “Lean on Me,” had goggles with them, just in case pepper spray is used.

There was a sense that the occupation in front of Philadelphia’s Gothic-style City Hall would soon be over, but hope that the movement would last.

“This is just baby steps,” said R.W. Dennen, who said he felt a bit guilty that he wasn’t preparing to be arrested.

Elsewhere on the East Coast, eight people were arrested in Maine after protesters in the Occupy Augusta encampment in Capitol Park took down their tents and packed their camping gear after being told to get a permit or move their shelters.

Protesters pitched tents Oct. 15 as part of the national movement but said Sunday they shouldn’t have to get a permit to exercise their right to assemble. Occupy leaders said a large teepee loaned by the Penobscot Indians and a big all-weather tent would stay up.

In Philadelphia, Steve Venus was fortifying the area around his tent with abandoned wood pallets left over from those who had already packed up. He said the $50 million construction project, including a planned ice skating rink, was not a good enough reason for Occupy Philadelphia to leave the plaza.

Venus, 22, said that by enforcing the deadline, the city was essentially telling Occupy supporters “your issues are not important. The only issue that’s important is the ice skating rink.”

On Friday, Mayor Michael Nutter expressed support for the movement’s ideals but said protesters must make room for the long-planned project, which they were told of when they set up camp Oct. 6.

Nutter was out of town Sunday, but his spokesman reiterated that “people are under orders to move.”

The mayor himself had an exchange on Twitter with hip-hop impresario Russell Simmons, who asked Nutter “to remember this is a non-violent movement — please show restraint tonight.”

Nutter’s response: “I agree.”

Graffiti, lack of sanitation and fire hazards, including smoking in tents, were among the city’s chief concerns at Dilworth, which had about 350 tents at the height of the movement.

___

Mulvihill reported from Philadelphia. Associated Press Writers Kathy Matheson in Philadelphia, Glenn Adams in Augusta, Maine, contributed to this story.

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