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Posts Tagged ‘Uttar Pradesh’

Power cut hits millions, among world’s worst outages

Posted by Admin on August 1, 2012

http://in.news.yahoo.com/power-blackout-sweeps-north-india-second-day-081130063.html

By Frank Jack Daniel | Reuters – 2 hours 10 minutes ago

              NEW DELHI (Reuters) – Hundreds of millions of people across India were left without power on Tuesday in one of the world’s worst blackouts, trapping miners, stranding train travellers and plunging hospitals into darkness when grids collapsed for the second time in two days.

Stretching from Assam to the Himalayas and the northwestern deserts of Rajasthan, the outage covered states where half of India’s 1.2 billion people live and embarrassed the government, which has failed to build up enough power capacity to meet soaring demand.

“Even before we could figure out the reason for yesterday’s failure, we had more grid failures today,” said R.N. Nayak, chairman of the state-run Power Grid Corporation.

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh had vowed to fast-track stalled power and infrastructure projects as well as introduce free market reforms aimed at reviving India’s flagging economy. But he has drawn fire for dragging his feet.

By nightfall, power was back up in the humid capital, New Delhi and much of the north, but a senior official said only a third was restored in the rural state of Uttar Pradesh, itself home to more people than Brazil.

The cuts in such a widespread area of the world’s second most populous nation appeared to be one of the biggest in history, and hurt Indians’ pride as the country seeks to emerge as a major force on the international stage.

“It’s certainly shameful. Power is a very basic amenity and situations like these should not occur,” said Unnayan Amitabh, 19, an intern with HSBC bank in New Delhi, before giving up on the underground train system and flagging down an auto-rickshaw to get home.

“They talk about big ticket reforms but can’t get something as essential as power supply right.”

Power Minister Sushilkumar Shinde blamed the system collapse on some states drawing more than their share of electricity from the over-burdened grid, but Uttar Pradesh’s top civil servant for energy said outdated transmission lines were at fault.

Asia’s third-largest economy suffers a peak-hour power deficit of about 10 percent, dragging on economic growth.

Between a quarter and 40 percent of Indians are not connected to the national grid.

Two hundred miners were stranded in three deep coal shafts in the state of West Bengal when their electric elevators stopped working. Eastern Coalfields Limited official Niladri Roy said workers at the mines, one of which is 700 metres (3,000 feet) deep, were not in danger and were being taken out.

Train stations in Kolkata were swamped and traffic jammed the streets after government offices closed early in the dilapidated coastal city of 5 million people.

The power failed in some major city hospitals and office buildings had to fire up diesel generators.

By mid-evening, services had been restored on the New Delhi metro system.

“PUSHED INTO DARKNESS”

On Monday, India was forced to buy extra power from the tiny neighbouring kingdom of Bhutan to help it recover from a blackout that hit more than 300 million people.

Indians took to social networking sites to ridicule the United Progressive Alliance (UPA) government, in part for promoting Shinde despite the power cuts.

Narendra Modi, an opposition leader and chief minister in Gujarat, a state that enjoys a surplus of power, was scornful.

“With poor economic management UPA has emptied the pockets of common man; kept stomachs hungry with inflation & today pushed them into darkness,” he said on his Twitter account.

The country’s southern and western grids were supplying power to help restore services, officials said.

The problem has been made worse by a weak monsoon in agricultural states such as wheat-belt Punjab and Uttar Pradesh in the Ganges plain, which has a larger population than Brazil.

With less rain to irrigate crops, more farmers resort to electric pumps to draw water from wells.

India’s electricity distribution and transmission is mostly state run, with private companies operating in Delhi, Mumbai and Kolkata. Less than a quarter of generation is private nationwide.

More than half the country’s electricity is generated by coal, with hydro power and nuclear also contributing.

Power shortages and a creaky road and rail network have weighed heavily on India’s efforts to industrialize. Grappling with the slowest economic growth in nine years, the government recently scaled back a target to pump $1 trillion into infrastructure over the next five years.

Major industries have their own power plants or diesel generators and are shielded from outages. But the inconsistent supply hits investment and disrupts small businesses.

High consumption of heavily subsidized diesel by farmers and businesses has fuelled a gaping fiscal deficit that the government has vowed to tackle to restore confidence in the economy.

But the poor monsoon means a subsidy cut is politically difficult.

On Tuesday, the central bank cut its economic growth outlook for the fiscal year that ends in March to 6.5 percent, from the 7.3 percent assumption made in April, putting its outlook closer to that of many private economists.

“This is going to have a substantial adverse impact on the overall economic activity. Power failure for two consecutive days hits sentiment very badly,” said N. Bhanumurthy, a senior economist at National Institute of Public Finance and Policy.

(Reporting by Delhi Bureau; Sujoy Dhar in Kolkata and Sharat Pradhan in Lucknow; Writing by Frank Jack Daniel; Editing by Robert Birsel and Diana Abdallah)

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Reputed websites under hacker threat: CERT-In

Posted by Admin on May 30, 2012

http://in.finance.yahoo.com/news/reputed-websites-under-hacker-threat-125757525.html

IANS – Sun 27 May, 2012 6:27 PM IST

New Delhi, May 27 (IANS) Websites of reputed government and private organisations are under threat from hackers, the Computer Emergency Response Team India (CERT-In) has said, warning users to be extra cautious while using the internet.

“It is observed that some hacker groups are launching distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks on websites of government and private organisations in India. The attacks may be targeted to different websites of reputed organisations,” CERT-In, the national nodal agency for responding to computer security incidents, said in an advisory on its website.

“These attacks are being launched through popular DDoS tools and can consume bandwidth requiring appropriate proactive actions in coordination with service providers,” it said.

The agency has asked users to deploy adequate security systems to deal with these attacks originating through DDoS.

As a counter measure, it has also suggested that the users review traffic patterns and if there is any rise, this should be reported to the agency.

In a recent written reply in the Lok Sabha, Minister of State for Communications and IT Sachin Pilot said 112 government websites, including that of Bharat Sanchar Nigam Ltd (BSNL), were hacked in just three months – Dec 2011 to Feb 2012.

These hacked websites belonged to the agencies in the governments of Andhra Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, Tamil Nadu, Maharashtra, Gujarat, Kerala, Orissa, Uttar Pradesh, Sikim and Manipur.

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Magnificent Women of India

Posted by Admin on February 26, 2012

http://in.lifestyle.yahoo.com/photos/magnificent-women-of-india-slideshow/;_ylt=Ai0GWSZgbSopIR0Wi_OkphNgmeh_;_ylu=X3oDMTM3anZmdnFiBG1pdAMEcGtnAzkxMGU2OGJlLTAzNTUtMzMyZS05MjRhLTg1MWU0OThiNTQzNARwb3MDNARzZWMDZW5kX3NzBHZlcgM4NjQzMjJkMi01ZWQ0LTExZTEtYTlmNy1hMWE4Njc4NDMzODc-;_ylv=3

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Note from Admin:- To the greatest nation on Earth and Mankind’s greatest compromise to the Divine,…For the Land of My Birth,My Love,My Glory,My Sacrifice and My Passing, Ever Unto Thee…I shall never forget you nor let go, for it is in you that I am forever nested beyond the confines of the Cosmos and Origin…

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When France-born photographer CLAUDE RENAULT came to India, he fell in love with the land he now calls “a special place” and his “second country.” His observant eye finds inspiration in commonplace sights that most people let pass without a second glance. His lens seeks out hidden character in the map of human faces, in their laugh lines, dark eyes and unpretentious smiles. A passionate traveler, Renault’s journey is fueled by the mantra: “I won’t travel just for a nice landscape or an historical monument, but for what makes a country: the people.” Enjoy his candid, fascinating and inspiring photos. You will never look at India the same way again. And if you are a foreigner wandering in India with a camera, we invite you to share your impressions of India.

Danuko Lakshmi, a Lambadi woman in Andhra Pradesh.

Photo by Claude Renault

Widows in Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh, renowned in mythology as Krishna‘s playground.

Photo by Claude Renault

Saying hello to God in Sri Sailam, Andhra Pradesh.

Photo by Claude Renault

Durgi is a shepherd I met in Hampi, Karnataka.

Photo by Claude Renault

Papu during the camel fair in Pushkar, Rajasthan, in 2001.

Photo by Claude Renault

Fatima Tabasu, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh in the bus going to Golconda.

Photo by Claude Renault

This Rajasthani pilgrim was sitting inside a small temple next to her husband in Ram Jhula, Rishikesh, Uttarakhand.

Photo by Claude Renault

This woman is the owner of a small ‘Chai’ place in Ram Jhula, Rishikesh, Uttarakhand.

Photo by Claude Renault

A Muslim girl in Gulbarga, Karnataka.

Photo by Claude Renault

A lovely woman I met walking in the streets of Jodhpur, Rajasthan.

Photo by Claude Renault

A Lambadi woman waiting for the bus in Hyderabad.

Photo by Claude Renault

Ma Ganga in Hampi, Karnataka.

Photo by Claude Renault

Danuko, Sri Sailam, Andhra Pradesh.

Photo by Claude Renault

Papu in Pushkar, Rajasthan. I met her for the first time in 2001. Now she owns a little shop near the Ghats.

Photo by Claude Renault

Claude Renault at work

France-born photographer Claude Renault in Varanasi.

View more of his work on his website.

Posted in India Forgotten | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Magnificent Women of India

Hell and high water

Posted by Admin on November 9, 2011

http://in.news.yahoo.com/deadly-flooding-in-india%E2%80%8E-.html;_ylt=Ag2B510rF03b7KqijuDm4kph_t5_;_ylu=X3oDMTQ2YWZvNzhxBG1pdANtb3Jlb253aWRlc2NyZWVuBHBrZwM1ZGQ0OWJhMi1mZTRjLTM5OTYtYWJlZi03Njc4ZjllMDQ0OWYEcG9zAzMEc2VjA01lZGlhRmVhdHVyZWRDYXJvdXNlbAR2ZXIDZjZhYTVkYjQtZWRhZS0xMWUwLWFkOWUtMWY0ZjBhNWU3MWM2;_ylg=X3oDMTJuamcybnFkBGludGwDaW4EbGFuZwNlbi1pbgRwc3RhaWQDMGJjYzhmOWMtYWRmMi0zNmM2LTk1MTItMzQ0NGY5MjFlNmU1BHBzdGNhdAMEcHQDY29taWMtZ2FsbGVyeQ–;_ylv=3

The annual cycle of drought and flood in India routinely makes headlines but it appears that this time the floods have the upper hand. Prolonged and intense monsoon rainfall has led rivers in northern and eastern India to flow above the danger mark, breach banks and overflow into habitation. As the Planning Commission Deputy Chairman Montek Singh Ahluwalia and other influencers debate if the Below Poverty Line cap for daily expenditure must be raised above Rs 32 (Rs 26 in rural India), untamed waters have devastated the livelihoods of about 4 million people in north and east India. In Orissa alone, 2.2 million people have been affected. Over 1,700 rural roads have been damaged and the state government has earmarked Rs 1,210 crore to bring life back to normal while it has asked the Centre for Rs 3,265 crore as compensation. The states of Assam, Bihar, Uttar Pradesh and West Bengal are also struggling to cope as rivers in spate have swept away people, livestock, bridges and homes.

Mon, Oct 3, 2011

AP Photo/Biswaranjan Rout

AP Photo/Biswaranjan Rout

A woman carries her injured son through flood waters at Pahanga village in Orissa’s Jajpur district. Monsoon rains have destroyed mud huts and flooded wide swaths of north and east India, leaving hundreds of thousands of people marooned by the raging waters.


 

AP Photo/ Aftab Alam Siddiqui

AP Photo/ Aftab Alam Siddiqui

At Kasimpurchak near Danapur Diara in Patna, a boat turns into a veritable Noah’s Ark as villagers share it with cattle to cross a flooded river. In Bihar, an estimated 2,512 boats have been deployed to evacuate 68,000 people as floods destroyed standing crops in 114,000 hectares of land and damaged over 15,000 homes and public buildings.


AP Photo/Kevin Frayer

AP Photo/Kevin Frayer

Boys row a makeshift banana raft on their way to a marooned community near Patamundi, about 120 kilometers north of Bhubaneshwar, India. The Orissa government has decided to withdraw air-dropping of relief materials as water levels have receded and most of the worst-hit areas are now accessible by road and some by boat. The death toll in the second spell of floods has risen to 40, an official said.


AP Photo/Biswaranjan Rout

AP Photo/Biswaranjan Rout

Villagers carrying relief materials brave floodwaters at Rasulpur village in Orissa’s Jajpur district. The southwest monsoon, which brings rain from June through September, is vital to agriculture but also cause floods and landslides.


AP Photo/Biswaranjan Rout

AP Photo/Biswaranjan Rout

Twenty out of Orissa’s 30 districts have been affected by successive floods and road communication has been snapped in several areas. The state government has decided to construct permanent helipads in coastal region for relief operation.


AP Photo/Biswaranjan RoutA villager stands on all that is left of a bridge at Rasulpur village in Orissa’s Jajpur district. Several bridges have been washed off, disrupting road connections across the beleaguered state. Three hundred rural bridges will be restored at a cost of Rs 1,000 crore under the Orissa Rural Bridges Scheme.


AP Photo/Biswaranjan Rout

AP Photo/Biswaranjan Rout

A woman returns to her village through flood waters at Rasulpur village in Orissa’s Jajpur district. A spokesperson of the National Rural Health Mission said 978 women in advanced stages of pregnancy had been marooned by the worst floods to hit the state in three decades.


AP Photo/Biswaranjan Rout

AP Photo/Biswaranjan Rout

A girl sleeps at her mud hut surrounded by flood waters at Pahanga village in Orissa’s Jajpur district. Nearly a thousand villages have been marooned by floods sparked by two spells of incessant monsoon rain.


AP Photo/Biswaranjan Rout

AP Photo/Biswaranjan Rout

A villager returns to his marooned house in Bari village, about 130 kilometers from Bhubaneshwar. The state government said it would spend Rs 1208 crore within 45 days on restoration and reconstruction work.


AP

AP

Village boys cross a flooded area on a makeshift raft in Orissa. The state government has decided to waive the examination fee for high school students in flood-affected areas.


AP Photo/Bikas Das

AP Photo/Bikas Das

Villagers ford floodwaters at Patamundi near Kendrapara, about 120 kilometers north of Bhubaneshwar. The state government has sought Rs 3,265 crore as grant from the National Disaster Relief Fund (NDRF) towards damages suffered in the twin floods in September.


AP Photo/Kevin Frayer

AP Photo/Kevin Frayer

Flood-displaced boys fish in floodwaters. An estimated 1109 villages have been marooned in two spells of flooding in 10 districts of Orissa.


REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta

REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta

Men ride a bicycle through a flooded road after a heavy downpour on the outskirts of Jammu. Monsoon rains were one percent above normal in mid-September, weakening from 39 percent above average in the previous week, the India Meteorological Department (IMD) said, easing concerns that heavy rains could damage planted crops.


AP

AP

Townsfolk in Varanasi wade through flood waters caused due to excess rainfall. Monsoon rains caused mud-walled homes to collapse and rescuers are struggling to reach affected villages in eastern Uttar Pradesh.


REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma

REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma

A car submerged in a flooded underpass after heavy rains in Noida, near New Delhi. Above-normal monsoon rains affected life all over north India.

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Diwali Celebrations Around the World

Posted by Admin on October 28, 2011

http://in.lifestyle.yahoo.com/diwali-celebrations-world-082624838.html

Though Diwali is an Indian festival, it is not limited to only India.

Various other countries celebrate the festival with equal pomp and gaiety as Indians do. The ultimate essence of Diwali, i.e. the triumph of good over evil, is maintained throughout different places and time zones.

Here are some countries of the world that celebrate Diwali.

Diwali Celebrations Around the World

Mauritius

Mauritius boasts of a staggering 63% of its entire population to be of Indian origin, 80% of which follow Hinduism. Therefore, Diwali is a festival of great significance in the island country. The festival is celebrated around the same time as in India. Beautifully lit earthen lamps are placed around the houses turning the island into a picturesque landscape. Sweets are specially prepared for the occasion and people of other religious and cultural beliefs also join the Hindu counterparts in the celebrations. Diwali also symbolizes the arrival of the summer season in the country.

Diwali Celebrations Around the World

Australia

Australia has an estimated population of 100,000 Indians settled there, with the majority of them being Hindus. Diwali is quite a major festival in the country with large scale Diwali events, like carnivals and fairs, organized in cities such as Sydney and Melbourne. The events feature fireworks display, food stalls offering Diwali sweets and delicacies, musical performances and also burning the effigy of Ravana.

Diwali Celebrations Around the World

Japan

In the land of the rising sun, Diwali signifies progress, happiness, longevity and prosperity. The festival is not celebrated in the same way as in our home country. Instead of lighting their homes up, people go out to gardens and orchards and hang colorful lanterns and paper-made structures on the branches of trees. The places of worship are decorated with wallpapers so as to bring about a festive mood amongst those who celebrate the festival.

Diwali Celebrations Around the World

Malaysia

Despite having only about 8% of its population belonging to Hindu community, Diwali is an important festival in Malaysia. Known as Hari Diwali, it is a public holiday in the country. The traditional ritual of oil bath begins the festival which includes prayers at household altars and visit to temples. Temples are adorned with flowers and oil lamps while parades and concerts are organized in some of the major cities. Firecrackers are, however, banned in this country.

Diwali Celebrations Around the World

South Africa

South Africa, a country which fought a long battle against apartheid, is home to the largest immigrant Indian population in the world. Most of the descendants of the immigrant Indians are settled in the KwaZulu Natal and Gauteng provinces and comprise about 65% of the entire population there. Most of them, reportedly, trace their origins to Uttar Pradesh, Tamil Nadu and Gujarat and the rituals are held in accordance with their communities, and in the same way as in India.

Diwali Celebrations Around the World

Thailand

Thailand is known to be a culturally rich country, hence a celebration of one of the most important festivals of the Hindus is an integral part of its itinerary. Here, Diwali is likened to ‘Lam Kriyongh’ which is also celebrated around the month of October/November. Here, the diyas are made of banana leaves instead, which hold candles, a coin and incense. The diyas are then set afloat on a river which makes it quite a spectacular sight for the people to witness.

Diwali Celebrations Around the World

Nepal

In Nepal, Diwali is known as ‘Tihar‘ and is celebrated in a grand manner over a span of 5 days. During these 5 days, animals like cows, dogs and crows are worshipped apart from Goddess Lakshmi. The people of the Nepali community play ‘Deusi’ and ‘Bhailo’ in which boys and girls go singing and dancing to different houses, giving them blessings while the owner of the house gives them either food items or money. The festivities end with ‘Bhai Tika’ where sisters give tika (colored powder applied on the forehead) and a garland of flowers to their brothers, praying for the brother’s long life and prosperity.

Diwali Celebrations Around the World

Singapore

Singapore’s Diwali celebrations are amongst the brightest in the world, with a spectacular display of lights throughout different cities. Diwali is one festival that is celebrated irrespective of ethnicity or religion, in the country. The place called “Little India” located in Serangoon Road, is fully covered with lights, colorful arches and garlands. Is is a custom to visit the temple to offer prayers and towards the evening, children and other grown ups go to open areas to light sparklers.

Diwali Celebrations Around the World

Trinidad & Tobago

Diwali holds a special place in the hearts of citizens of the Caribbean nation, with 43% of the population being of Indian origin. The day is officially declared as a public holiday and is looked at with much anticipation throughout the year. Celebrations of the festival begin 9 days in advance of the actual event. These 9 days are laced with dance performances, displays by Hindu religious sects, theatre, worship of Goddess Lakshmi and lighting of diyas. Areas having a strong Hindu population are decorated with blinding lights and the last day sees a spectacular display of fireworks.

Diwali Celebrations Around the World

Britain

Since Indians are the second largest ethnic minority group in Britain, Diwali is the highlight of the Indian calendar in the country. The festival, though primarily celebrated in much fervor by NRIs, does not remain limited to them. The festive spirit trickles down to people of other cultures and with it being celebrated at the House of Commons, gains even more significance. Leicester city is particularly noted for its major Diwali celebrations as a large number of people gather there to celebrate the Indian festival. (Special Features, MensXP.com)

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