Revolutionizing Awareness

helping humanity, make choices, more so through awareness, than ignorance

Posts Tagged ‘Volcano’

Opinion

Posted by Admin on September 30, 2011

http://www.cosmicparadigm.com/2011/09/opinion/

Posted on September 17, 2011Greetings: In the past few weeks, I have received information from several sources about the extraordinary energies that will be hitting Earth in the coming weeks and days. I believe these sources to be more or less accurate in what theyare foreseeing.Several of these sources predict that these energies will cause widespread destruction and chaos. They forecast earthquakes and tsunamis, volcanic activity and extreme weather, all resulting in loss of lives. I believe that is a fear-based, 3rd Dimension interpretation of what these people are seeing. I also believe that many people who cling to life in the 3rd Dimension will experience these very conditions.

Could it not be that amidst all the energies impacting Earth and transforming it into a pristine planet that there are energies of transformation for us as individuals? If we can accept them in this beneficial light, the light of love, then we should welcome their impact, for they will usher in a new age of enlightenment and Oneness. I believe that if our frequency is of a higher Dimension, we will indeed see beneficial effects in these energies.

So it remains to be seen how these energies will impact each of us individually. I for one intend to accept them as beneficial and go with their transformative value. This is my opinion; take it for what it is worth.

In Truth, Love, and Joy

Mark Kimmel

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Volcano erupts in central Indonesia

Posted by Admin on July 25, 2011

http://in.news.yahoo.com/photos/volcano-erupts-in-central-indonesia-1310706494-slideshow/indonesia-volcano-150711-04-photo.html

An Indonesian volcano spit lava and smoke thousands of feet into the air early Friday, sending panicked residents fleeing down its slopes.

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Mount Lokon spews hot lava and volcanic ash during an eruption in Tomohon in Indonesia‘s North Sulawesi province July 14, 2011. Indonesia’s Mount Lokon erupted to spew hot lava and volcanic ash as high as 1,500 metres (5,000 feet) in the north of Sulawesi island, prompting panicked residents to flee the agricultural area, a government official said on Friday. REUTERS/Stringer

Map locates Mount Lokon in Indonesia, which erupted early Friday, forcing evacuations

  1. Map locates Mount Lokon in Indonesia, which erupted early Friday, forcing evacuation

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The Lokon volcano erupts near Tomohon on July 15, 2011. The Indonesian volcano erupted late July 14, spewing rocks, lava and ash hundreds of metres into the air, an official said, three days after its alert status was raised to the highest level. There has been a significant rise in volcanic activity at Mount Lokon on Sulawesi Island since June 9, prompting hundreds of people to evacuate the area. AFP PHOTO / TENGKU

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This picture taken on July 13, 2011 shows the Lokon volcano spewing smokes in Tomohon, North Sulawesi. Indonesia on July 11 said it would evacuate hundreds of people living near Mount Lokon on Sulawesi island after raising the volcano’s alert status to the highest level. AFP PHOTO / GLEN RARUNG

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Mount Lokon spews volcanic smoke in Tomohon, North Sulawesi, Indonesia, Tuesday, July 12, 2011. Officials raised the alert for the Indonesian volcano with history of violent explosions to its highest level Monday, following a series of eruptions over the weekend. (AP Photo/Grace Wakary)

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The glow of lava from Mount Lokon’s eruption is seen against the night sky as seen from Manado, North Sulawesi, Indonesia, early Friday, July 15, 2011. The volcano spit lava and smoke thousands of feet into the air early Friday, sending panicked residents fleeing down its slopes. There were no immediate reports of casualties. (AP Photo)

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Mount Lokon spews volcanic smoke in Tomohon, North Sulawesi, Indonesia, Tuesday, July 12, 2011. Officials raised the alert for the Indonesian volcano with history of violent explosions to its highest level Monday, following a series of eruptions over the weekend. (AP Photo/Grace Wakary)

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Indonesian volcano erupts, 20 injured by hot ash

Posted by Admin on October 26, 2010

A villager watches Mount Merapi in Kaliadem, ...

By SLAMET RIYADI, Associated Press – 35 mins ago

MOUNT MERAPI, Indonesia – Indonesia’s most volatile volcano erupted Tuesday after scientists warned that pressure building beneath its dome could trigger the most powerful explosion in years. A 2-month-old baby reportedly died as panicked villagers fled the area.

Smoke poured out of Mount Merapi, obscuring its cone, according to footage from the private station, MetroTV. Up to 20 people were injured by the hot ash spewing from volcano, said an AP reporter who saw them being taken away for treatment. One burn victim’s skin was coated in the gray powder, which also blanketed vehicles in the area.

Some 11,400 villagers who live on the 9,737-foot (2,968-meter-) high mountain were urged to evacuate, but only those within four miles (seven kilometers) of the crater were forced by authorities to do so. Most of those who fled were the elderly and children. Some adults said they decided to stay to tend to homes and farms on the fertile slopes.

There are fears that the current activity could foreshadow a much more destructive explosion in the coming weeks or months, though it is possible, too, that the volcano will settle back down after a slow, long period of letting off steam.

As they contended with the volcano, Indonesian officials were also trying to assess the impact of Monday’s 7.7-magnitude earthquake off the coast of Sumatra, about 800 miles (1,300 kilometers) from Merapi. The temblor caused a tsunami that left hundreds dead or missing on a string of remote islands.

MetroTV reported that the baby died when a mother ran in panic after the eruption started. Its report cited a local doctor and showed the mother weeping as the baby was covered with a white blanket at a hospital. The report did not make clear if it was a boy or girl.

Subandriyo, the chief vulcanologist in the area, said the eruption started just before dusk Tuesday. The volcano had rumbled and groaned for hours.

“There was a thunderous rumble that went on for ages, maybe 15 minutes,” said Sukamto, a farmer who by nightfall had yet to abandon his home on the slopes. “Then huge plumes of hot ash started shooting up into the air.”

Scientists have warned the pressure building beneath the dome could presage one of the biggest eruptions in years at Merapi, literally Mountain of Fire, which lies on the main island of Java, some 310 miles (500 kilometers) southeast of the capital Jakarta.

The alert level for Merapi has been raised to its highest level.

“The energy is building up. … We hope it will release slowly,” government volcanologist Surono told reporters. “Otherwise, we’re looking at a potentially huge eruption, bigger than anything we’ve seen in years.”

In 2006, an avalanche of blistering gases androck fragments raced down the volcano and killed two people. A similar eruption in 1994 killed 60 people, and 1,300 people died in a 1930 blast.

This vast archipelago is prone to earthquakes and volcanic activity due to its location on the so-called Pacific Ring of Fire — a series of faultlines stretching from the Western Hemisphere through Japan and Southeast Asia.

There are more than 129 active volcanos to watch in Indonesia, which is spread across 17,500 islands.

___

Associated Press writer Irwan Firdaus contributed to this report from Jakarta.

 

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21 Volcanoes Across Country Ready to Erupt

Posted by Admin on October 4, 2010

http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/indonesia/21-volcanoes-across-country-ready-to-erupt/399206

Candra Malik | October 01, 2010

In this file photo, Mount Sinabung, one of the 21 volcanoes being monitored for signs of danger.  (JG Photo)

In this file photo, Mount Sinabung, one of the 21 volcanoes being monitored for signs of danger. (JG Photo)

Bandung. Twenty-one volcanoes across Indonesia could erupt at any time, leading to natural disasters, officials have warned. 

An official from the Volcanology and Geological Disaster Mitigation Agency (PVMBG) told the Jakarta Globe on Friday that the alert for 18 volcanoes had been raised from Level 1, or “normal,” to Level 2, or “beware.” 

Hendrasto, the head of the PVMBG’s Volcano Observation Unit, said that three other volcanoes were on Level 3, or “standby,” just one step below full alert, or Level 4. 

One of those three is Mount Sinabung in Karo district, North Sumatra, which began erupting on Aug. 29 after lying dormant for 400 years. Its last major eruption, on Sept. 7, spewed volcanic ash more than 5,000 meters into the atmosphere. 

“We downgraded Sinabung from Level 4 to Level 3 on September 23,” Hendrasto said. “However, we still urge the public to remain alert for any danger.” 

Most of the villagers who were evacuated after the initial eruption have since been allowed to return to their homes. 

The two other volcanoes on Level 3 alert are Mount Karangetang on Siau Island in North Sulawesi and Mount Ibu on Halmahera Island in North Maluku. Karangetang is considered the most active volcano in the archipelago, with 41 major eruptions since 1675. Its last eruption, on Aug. 6, is believed to have killed four people. 

Ibu, meanwhile, has experienced ongoing eruptions since April 5, 2008, feeding a lava flow down one side of the mountain. 

The 18 volcanoes on Level 2 alert include Papandayan in West Java, Slamet in Yogyakarta, Merapi in Central Java and Semeru and Bromo in East Java. 

“Semeru and Slamet are the highest peaks in their provinces, while Bromo is a popular tourist destination,” Hendrasto said. “Because of their popularity, we are urging the regional administrations to issue a warning advising the public of the raised alert status.” 

Other volcanoes on Level 2 alert include Talang in West Sumatra, Kaba in Bengkulu, Kerinci in Jambi and Anak Krakatau in the Sunda Strait, between Sumatra and Java. 

Anak Krakatau is the remnant of Krakatau, whose violent eruption in August 1883 killed an estimated 40,000 people and was heard up to 5,000 kilometers away. 

The eruption caused tsunamis as far away as South Africa, and resulted in global temperatures dropping by more than 1 degree Celsius. 

Kerinci, at 3,800 meters, is the highest peak in Sumatra and the highest volcano in the country. It is a popular destination with hikers and wildlife enthusiasts because it lies inside the Bukit Barisan National Park.

In the east of the country, the Level 2 volcanoes are Batur in Bali, Sangeang Api and Rinjani in West Nusa Tenggara, Egon and Rokatenda in East Nusa Tenggara, Soputan and Lokon in North Sulawesi, and Dukono and Gamalama in North Maluku. 

“Our officials will keep monitoring these volcanoes around the clock and provide real-time updates,” Hendrasto said. 

All 21 volcanoes highlighted have erupted sometime this year, and are among 59 active volcanoes across the country.

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This Volcano Is About More Than Flights

Posted by Admin on April 20, 2010

While it is early in the morning in Europe the following picture shows the impact of the volcano in Iceland on European air traffic (as of Thursday), if you compare Northern (none) and Southern (60) European flights. The blue crosses are airports. The volcano has already had a stunning impact on Europe, although articles about it are already dropping below the lead headlines.

There is a thought that the plume may last another five days, and even though the cloud is largely invisible to those who are being impacted by it, the damage by neglecting these precautions could be severe. And given that the British election is on May 6th, the impact of a sustained eruption on the debates in the UK, and the result may go beyond just limiting the travel of those who would campaign, to become more dominant with the length of the flight curtailments and the responses to help resolve what are likely to be growing transportation problems.

Flight Map

The presence of sulphur dioxide is already obvious to local residents, though there don’t appear to be any concerns over its toxicity. This is the toxicity information given by gasdetection.com:

WITH ACUTE EXPOSURE, 5 PPM CAUSES DRYNESS OF NOSE & THROAT AND A MEASUREABLE INCR IN RESISTANCE TO BRONCHIAL AIR FLOW; 6 TO 8 PPM CAUSES A DECR IN TIDAL RESP VOLUME. SNEEZING, COUGH & EYE IRRITATION OCCUR AT 10 PPM; 20 PPM CAUSED BRONCHOSPASM; 50 PPM CAUSES EXTREME DISCOMFORT BUT NO INJURY IN LESS THAN A 30-MIN EXPOSURE … 1000 PPM CAUSES DEATH IN FROM 10 MIN TO SEVERAL HR BY RESP DEPRESSION.

The larger eruptions of Katla, have ejected up to 1.5 x 10^9 cu m of material with a Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI) of up to 5. For comparison Mt Pinatubo in 1991 ejected 1.1 x 10^10 cu m with a VEI of 6.

The Times has an interesting graphic that shows some of the concerns and I am going to use a bit of it to show that the problem may be a little bigger than even the article suggests.

To begin with recognize that Iceland is at the intersection of different plates that together form the shell of the planet. Whereas in some parts of the world these plates are pushing together and riding over each other, in this part of the world they are tending more to separate, so that the magma, on which the plates ride, can make its way up along the joint planes and erupt at the surface.

Volcano Map

Map of Iceland showing major volcanoes (The Times of London)

Now what the picture is concerned about is that generally when Eyjaflallajokull erupts so does Kalta, which is right next door. But Katla is a larger system and the eruption is generally much more severe.

Unfortunately what has also to be considered is that there are a whole line of craters, not shown on this map, between Katla and Vatnajokull, which are also a worry. Laki, an even greater threat than Katla, lies along this line.

Iceland’s Laki volcano erupted in 1783, freeing gases that turned into smog. The smog floated across the Jet Stream, changing weather patterns. Many died from gas poisoning in the British Isles. Crop production fell in western Europe. Famine spread. . . . . . .

The winter of 1784 was also one of the longest and coldest on record in North America. New England reported a record stretch of below-zero temperatures and New Jersey reported record snow accumulation. The Mississippi River also reportedly froze in New Orleans.

It is at the orange flag in this picture.

Volcano Map

(Google Earth)

There is a line of eruption calderas from Katla up to Laki, which is up around Skaftareldar.
The 3.5 earthquake I wrote about on Bit Tooth Energy lies beyond Laki on the line from Eyjaflallajokull, and was centered further north in the Vatnajokull. Some have blamed the weather created by the eight-month eruption of Laki as a possible contributory cause to the French Revolution.

An eruption of that length, ejecting as much material as it may into the atmosphere, would have consequences that go beyond just the ability to survive the noxious gaseous clouds.

The impact of the dust is shown in this picture from the British Met Office, which shows that plume reaching down past Scotland:

Volcano Map

Dust cloud passing Scotland (Met Office)

And the consequent distribution at different levels of the atmosphere.

Volcano Map

High and low level ash distribution (Met Office via the Guardian)

The agriculture of Europe would be damaged by a prolonged eruption with this distribution, and with it the possible production of biodiesel. Consider that the growth of rapeseed (canola) around the world has been steadily rising over the past few years.

Rapeseed Production

With European countries sitting just behind the leaders.

Rapeseed Production

Somewhere over 4 million metric tons of the crop currently goes to producing biodiesel, mainly in Europe. (Heading up towards 100,000 bd). Losing a year of that crop (and large scale volcanic activity can have an impact for over four years on the climate and the ground chemistry), particularly given the current possible approach of the peaking of conventional oil production, could have an unanticipated impact on overall liquid fuel availability and price.

Unfortunately rapeseed is only one of the crops that will be affected, and the significant drop in crop yields does not appear to be getting much attention yet.

Beyond that, there should be a little concern for the wind turbines that are now dotted over the horizon. The concern is with the speed at which the tips travel through the air. The air, that looks clean, will contain small particles of very sharp glass and other volcanic ejecta, that are the primary cause for the grounding of aircraft across Europe. While the aircraft can see very sudden loss in engine power, because of the high speeds with which they encounter the clouds, and the volumes of debris sucked into engines that then fail. (There are also video explanations.)

Wind wing tip speeds have been projected to be in the range from 264 ft/sec to 326 ft/sec. At impact speeds over 120 ft/sec the particles from the eruption will start to erode the blades of the turbine. If the eruption continues for weeks, and the turbines rotate in that atmosphere (which looks clear to normal vision) then they will lose surface quality, and perhaps the particles will enter into the generators (as they do on aircraft) doing significant damage.

Thus, beyond the initial inconvenience of the loss of a way to fly (bearing in mind I am supposed to fly to Europe myself soon), there are the longer concerns over both the crops this summer and for the next four, and for the longer term health of the turbines. All in all it is a reminder that there is never a time that Nature, with a little nudge, cannot remind us of the risks of complacency.

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